tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-48240821583854771172012-04-16T00:29:12.830-07:00Autism, Epilepsy and Self-Injurious BehaviorBlogging About Autism, Epilepsy and Self-injurious Behavior. Commentary. Analysis. Advocacy. Education.Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.comBlogger64125tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-7025004059097571202012-04-12T11:39:00.000-07:002012-04-15T23:30:06.661-07:00<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Five Things to Remember When Caring &nbsp;for Non-Verbal Severely-Autistic &nbsp;Individuals.</span><br /><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Georgia;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><ol start="1" style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">They can’t tell you if they’re in pain. Watch for changes in behavior, eating, sleeping and mood.&nbsp; I.e...</span><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 11pt;">excessive crying, increased self-injurious behaviors, aggression, increased seizure activity, insomnia, excessive sleeping, muscle weakness, unusual screaming, distended stomach, new changes in eye movement increasingly lethargic. </span><span style="font-family: Georgia;">&nbsp;Sometimes hidden LOW grade chronic infections are present that don’t show up on a blood test. <o:p></o:p></span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin-left: .25in;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;"><br /><br /><o:p></o:p></span></div><ol start="2" style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">They may have paradoxical reaction to some medications.&nbsp; Ie...ativan used for calming may cause mania or Valerian Root may cause insomnia. <o:p></o:p></span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><ol start="3" style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">They may refuse to eat and drink several times before finally eating.&nbsp; If you give up, they won’t receive proper nutrition and hydration. Keep trying. Move them to a different room. Come back. Try again. <o:p></o:p></span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><ol start="4" style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Food preferences may change. One week the autistic person may prefer crunchy, salty foods. The next, sweet and sour, the next warm foods only, the next cold foods only, and finally, they may refuse any food unless it’s minced or pureed foods.&nbsp; It’s is critical to learn as much as you can about the autistic individual’s behaviors and preferences. <o:p></o:p></span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><ol start="5" style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">They are smarter than they may appear. Even if they’re sitting alone and appear in own world, they still need stimulation. Give them sensory toys to chew on or play with. Placing them in front of a TV for hours— in some cases— isn’t therapeutic. TV today is not like when I was young. Visual pictures move FAST. Commercials are annoying and loud. It can overexcite the brain and later trigger undesirable behaviors. Sitting in a garden, with a little sunshine, proper hydration, reading them a book and playing Mozart would be a good alternative.<o:p></o:p></span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-702500405909757120?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-80261688452724265202012-04-10T19:21:00.000-07:002012-04-10T19:22:17.165-07:00Florida Mom of Severely-Autistic Son with SIB in Crisis<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border: 0;" /></a></div><br />Just saw this Jacksonville, Florida news story (Jacksonville Mother Feels the Pain of Caring for 20-year old Autistic Son) and it is yet another severe autism reality that must be seen. The mom in this video is at her wit's end. Her son, Harley, is destroying the home. He's slapping himself in the face and head. He's still in diapers. He screams. He punches holes in the wall. Anti-psychotics aren't helping. And he's no small guy. At 6'2" and 252 lbs, he looks more like a running back than a young man with profound autism.<br /><br />Like so many of us who have family members with severe autism, our lives are upside down. How we make it through some days is only by the grace of God. And by having tangible, effective supports. This mom needs help. Sadly, getting help for your severely-autistic family member is never easy. And I mean never. Matt Soergel, the writer of the newspaper story about this case reminds us, "Life with Harley means Sheffield has stepped on a nonstop treadmill of bureaucracy."<br /><br />Why can't legislators make it easier? Something has to change.<br /><br />Clearly, in cases like this an expedited process is in order. The mom also suffers from post-traumatic disorder. No surprise there. After all, when you live in a world where your autistic child has been banging, slamming and screaming for years, you tend to get a little jumpy. She says she needs a stiff drink, shoot I'd like to send her a case of Merlot. Apparently, an attorney is helping with the case. It's a travesty that families have to rely on attorneys for a situation that is an obvious on-going crisis.<br /><br />Ven Sequenzia of Autism Society of Florida reminds us, "A lot of these kids don't end up getting anywhere near what they need...the only way the state responds is to litigation."The mom tried home care, but caregivers sent were "untrained and ill-equipped to take care of him." Not surprising either. It took me months to find nurses who could handle my autistic son. The state agency charged with helping me find caregivers never did. As the mom speaks you can see and hear the urgency and distress. Are we not a nation who prides itself on caring for our most vulnerable citizens? Every night I see commercials about abused animals. And shows telling us to support illegal immigrants and transgender rights. And how we must help poor people in other countries. How is it then that America's severely-autistic citizens in constant crisis remain so invisible?<br /><br />No doubt, our priorities in this nation are out of order. If only the mainstream media were so obsessed with severe autism we may see some real progress in getting this population the help they so desperately need.</div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-8026168845272426520?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-3938349002392617412012-04-01T03:15:00.002-07:002012-04-13T20:11:37.740-07:00Home Care Vs. Out of Home Care for Autistic Adults<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border: 0;" /></a><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">What MySeverely-Autistic Adult Son Would Cost California if our Family Didn’t ReceiveHome Care Support:</span><br /><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">Accordingto California’s Legislative Analyst Office, the cost of <u>basic</u> placementfor my severely-autistic 23-yr old son at the place he would’ve went (Fairview DevelopmentalCenter) if we didn’t fight to keep him home is:&nbsp;$<b>355,424</b> a year. Ironically aFairview team of experts evaluated him at needing “2:1 care” during time ofextreme self-injurious behavior. <o:p></o:p></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="background-attachment: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: white; background-image: initial; background-origin: initial; color: #009933; font-family: Arial;">Source: <a href="http://www.lao.ca.gov/.../developmental-services-budget-update-030112.p">www.lao.<b>ca</b>.gov/.../<b>developmental</b>-<b>services</b>-budget-update-030112.p</a><o:p></o:p></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">Accordingto a Disability Right’s legal analysis, cost of providing 3- properly trained employees(who split shifts throughout year) for my severely-autistic son’s required <u>24hour, 7 day a week 1:1 protective care--would cost the state institution anadditional</u>: $<b>193,775</b> a year. <o:p></o:p></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">Total: $<b>549,199. </b>This total doesn’t includeoutside services that would be utilized to manage my son’s level of complex behavioraland medical care. The total amount also doesn’t include episodic 2:1 staffing,which is a state documented need. Nor does it consider cost of overtime orworkman’s comp claims for state employees working with my son’s level of care.Considering these realities, the cost of caring for my son at a state institution rises toover ONE MILLION bucks a year.<b> <o:p></o:p></b></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><b><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">Currently, California <i>is <u>providing a fraction of that amount</u></i><u></u>for my son’s care. And it's in the least restrictive environment, at home, witha family and nurses who know and understand his complex needs. <o:p></o:p></span></b></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">Recall familiesaren’t obligated under California law to care for adult autistic children. It’sa sacrifice. It’s not always easy. <o:p></o:p></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">Whenfamilies provide home care, they use their own stuff. This means increased wearand tear on home, along with increased expenses. As in: 5-mattresses a year(the number of annual X I’ve had to replace soiled mattresses), broken faucets, or excessivewater bills (my son’s obsessed with 3-baths a day plus hot tub is used asemergency intervention for extreme SIB), extra garbage costs (diapers, bedpads, chucks, nursing gloves, air purifiers, food), smoke detectors, heat andair conditioning, etc...<o:p></o:p></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">How elseto families providing home care save state big bucks? Doing the never endinglaundry (many severely-autistic go through 2-3 clothing changes a day), paying for gas toand from medical appointments, recreational costs, special foods, haircuts, sheets,weighted blankets, allergy free pillows, sensory toys, special bathing suits, life vests, towels, shirts, shoes, socks, hats, sunglasses, sunscreen, icepacks, music therapy CD’s, wound care items, oxygen tank fees, special lotions, shampoos,conditioners, vitamins, herbs, toothpaste, jackets, sensory toys, etc... &nbsp;<o:p></o:p></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">Alsoconsider when families receive state-funded home support, family may pay homehealth aides/nurses directly from a stipend. This means family must use their personal computer,printer, paper, stamps, envelopes, gas, lights, phone and precious time toensure overall home support is a success.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">Other duties include (all of which Ido) recruiting, training, hiring and monitoring home health staff. This isn’tby choice. State officials could never find nurses or health aides for my son,as if they weren’t invested in his home care. I had to go out and recruit my own team of nurses.&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></span></div><div class="MsoNormal"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">I alsoprovide the medical, behavioral and nutritional management and (along with nurses) oversee medications. For over two decades, the state has completely failed to help my son's behavioral disorder, despite paying over 23 behavioral specialists.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">I, like many parents of autistic children, don’t get a salary for the incredible amount of work we have done or must do. If my son were placed out of home, personsdoing this work cost a fortune.<o:p></o:p></span><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia;"><span style="font-size: 19px;">Finally, I'm not opposed to placing an autistic person in an institutional or group home setting. I am opposed to bureaucrats who don't invest time into providing families with effective home based supports. It's easier for them to do abstract, sloppy reports, give up, and then start the out of home placement.&nbsp;</span></span><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia;"><span style="font-size: 19px;"><br /></span></span><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia;"><span style="font-size: 19px;">More effort and funding should be put into securing autistic children and adults home supports. What does that mean?&nbsp;</span></span><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia;"><span style="font-size: 19px;"><br /></span></span><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia;"><span style="font-size: 19px;">It depends on severity of situation. One family may need only 5-hours a day of respite care to maintain the autistic person at home. Another may need 16 hours a day. Still another, 24 hour support. In some cases, a weekend placement is what's needed.&nbsp;</span></span><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia;"><span style="font-size: 19px;"><br /></span></span><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia;"><span style="font-size: 19px;">One of the greatest impediments to securing home care for autistic adults is the lack of skilled caregivers who understand this very unique population.&nbsp;</span></span><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia;"><span style="font-size: 19px;"><br /></span></span><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia;"><span style="font-size: 19px;">You absolutely cannot assign just any nurse or caregiver to a severely-autistic person with self-injurious or aggressive behaviors. Nurses and caregivers must be specially trained and demonstrate skills to handle this unique population.&nbsp;</span></span><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 19px;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 19px;">There isn't one state program that trains nurses to work with severely-autistic patients in our local hospitals or community settings. &nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia;"><span style="font-size: 19px;"><br /></span></span><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia;"><span style="font-size: 19px;"><br /></span></span><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia;"><span style="font-size: 19px;"><br /></span></span><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia;"><span style="font-size: 19px;"><br /></span></span></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-393834900239261741?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-42574694575642160172012-03-18T19:51:00.000-07:002012-03-22T14:23:14.982-07:00Realities of Parenting Severely-Autistic Children<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Sunday, ice cold and rainy. This makes a difficult day for my autistic son, Jamey, his nurse and the entire family. Wind and hail cancel plans to go anywhere. We’re stuck inside. You can only walk so much in the limited space of a home. <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Be great to have a giant indoor gym. Or spacious covered, enclosed patio. </i>I consider the Mall, but that’s a no go, since we’re dealing with a leaky roof. Seems a new leak appears every few hours. I divide my time between gathering buckets and responding to Jamey’s needs. To prevent self-injurious behavior, the day becomes a steady stream of acute interventions. I help the nurse massage Jamey’s legs, arms and feet with apricot oil infused with lavender and orange. I assist in giving 2-3 warm Epsom salt baths, every 5 hours. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Around 3pm, because Jamey is exhibiting repetitive loud vocalizations, I crack open a capsule of L-Tryosine and pour it into his mouth. Within an hour, this reduces disruptive vocalizations. Thank you God!</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">The nurse on duty is a lifesaver. After we had won more nursing hours, I recruited him from a nursing training program. &nbsp;Just a well-rounded, hard working person, who is also a great father, so I know when he’s with Jamey, he treats him as a father would treat his own son. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">After another bath, Jamey shivers and stamps his feet. He’s in a hurry to get back to bed and bounce. He loves to bounce. The nurse offers Jamey his hand held vibration tube. Jamey holds it against his cheek and smiles. Then he starts hitting his neck with it. The nurse re-directs him to hold vibration tube on his chest. He thumps the tube on chest. He’s laughing as he does this, so we know it is behaviorally driven. He’s not in pain or anything else that could explain this. Just as he’s about to thump tube on lip, I grab it. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">It begins to hail. On his bed, staring out the window, Jamey watches tiny lumps of falling ice. He’s always watching the weather. The nurse straightens the room and does some charting. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Jamey has a few myoclonic jerks. I pour two tablespoons of Blackberry Swirl Barlean’s Fish oil in his water, hand it to the nurse. “Just give it to him whenever he’s ready to drink,” I suggest. Jamey is funny this way. Even when you know he’s thirsty, he may refuse a drink up to 5 xs, before he finally decides he wants it and gulps the entire amount. Perseverance pays off. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Around 7pm, Jamey will eat dinner and be given evening medications. Topamax. Keppra. Mirtazapine. Clonazepam. These are hard on a young liver. That’s why I buy and supply Jamey with Milk Thistle and N-acetylcysteine. Both are potent liver protectors. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">No matter how many cups of tea today, I feel fuzzy. Every brain has its ups and downs. I wouldn’t be surprised if my brain is sapped of serotonin and dopamine. It’s been years of acute and chronic stress. “Are you okay,” asks my teen son. “You look terrible.” I appreciate such honesty. It’s true. I’m sporting pajamas splashed with Ensure. Hair matted with oatmeal, as if there’s still an infant in the home. Eyes smudged with yesterday’s kohl eyeliner. And frankly, I don’t give a damn. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Tomorrow, Jamey goes to his day program. He’ll be back on routine. I’ll get dressed. Put on some fresh make-up. Condition my hair. Enjoy thinking without constant interruptions. Work on knee rehab exercises (a few months ago a horse fell on my knee and I recently had surgery). </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Wait a second. Can you imagine if I had no help with Jamey after knee surgery?</span></i><span style="font-family: Georgia;"> Little or no help is the reality for many parents with severely-autistic children. The only reason I have help is because I fought like a caged and wounded animal to get it. I worry again. Damn it, I’m always worrying. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">What if the relief and support we have now is, when we least expect it, is challenged? <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Unlikely, but never be too sure. Never be too confident.&nbsp; Stay guarded. </i>What if some bureaucrat, trying to cut costs, arises and presents with the casual cruelty of a person who has never lived with severe autism? And tries to bully us into some bull? These are realities. I play these scenarios in my head. I gather endless evidence to protect my son— just in case. Evidence of when he was left alone in his room at a group home to beat himself so badly he needed ear surgery to repair the damage. Evidence of officials paid to provide supports who denied us support in times of greatest need. Evidence of other severely-autistic persons killed in out of home placements. Murdered and ignored. Evidence of cost of care of severely-autistics in state institutions vs. cost effective care provided at home. Evidence of dead parents and dead autistic children heard of only after their bodies are carried away and buried in the earth. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Maybe there’s part of me that knows because I have gotten the support my son needs, I must help others find the support they need. How do I help? I haven’t met the barricaded bureaucrats invading their lives with nonsensical excuses to deny help. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">The emotional toll of always fighting for your child is both invigorating and debilitating. I secretly ache for families I fear may not make it. Who may end up another tragic headline in tomorrow’s news. I worry about myself. Even in my strength, there is still a piece of me that is fragile, fearful and feral. God has to constantly humble and teach me. I can be stubborn. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Will time heal these worries? Or will they open each time another incident occurs? Or do spontaneous remissions or bad news make me stronger? Spur me to regroup, rethink and act? Do I realize these worries and threats may always be here, but it’s how I react and handle them that will shape and hold our lives? </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">“You’re obsessing again,” I was told during battles to get more help. Can you imagine if I hadn’t been obsessing? I’d be trapped in my home, going nuts. My son would have little support. You don’t get through life with a severely-autistic child without being a little obsessive. Perhaps a bit of obsession gives parents of autistic children an advantage. Don’t give up. Stay focused. As is true of ice cold, rainy days, there is always tomorrow. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><sup><span style="font-family: Georgia;">“</span></sup><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 11pt;">God can do anything, you know—far <u>more than you could ever imagine or guess or request in your wildest dreams! </u>He does it not by pushing us around but by <u>working within us</u>, his Spirit deeply and gently within us.” Ephesians 3:20 (MSG)</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 11pt;">“</span><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Georgia; font-size: 11pt;">Speak up for those who can't speak for themselves, for the rights of all who need an advocate.” Proverbs 31:8&nbsp; (Complete Jewish Bible).</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 11pt;">“Those who sow in <u>tears</u> will reap a harvest of joy; <u>for though they may weep while going forth to plant their seed, if they persevere, they will undoubtedly return rejoicing—bringing their sheaves with them.</u>” Psalms 126</span><span style="font-family: Georgia;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-4257469457564216017?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com1tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-78287733592960022112012-03-10T17:23:00.002-08:002012-03-13T16:08:44.763-07:00Practical Gifts for Severely-Autistic Individuals<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">Practical Gifts for Severely-Autistic Individuals </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">A lot of people don’t know what gifts to give a severely-autistic person for special occasions, such as Christmas or Birthdays. Here are a few practical ideas. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">For Autistic Individuals with Epilepsy: </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><ol style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt; mso-list: l2 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">Fish Oils</span></u><span style="font-family: Georgia;">. A good brand is Carlson. Other brands are good too, but here’s Carlson link. Carlson</span><span style="font-family: Georgia; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;"> Labs. <b>...</b> <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span>fully potent and free of detrimental levels of <b>mercury</b>, cadmium, lead, PCB's:</span><span style="font-family: Arial;"> </span><span style="display: none; font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span><cite><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #0e774a;">www.<b>carlson</b>labs.com/p-70-very-finest-<b>fish</b>-<b>oil</b>-lemon-flavor.aspx</span></span></cite><span class="flc"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"> </span></span></li><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt; mso-list: l2 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span class="flc"><u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">L-Taurine</span></u></span><span class="flc"><u><span style="font-family: Georgia; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">.</span></u></span><span class="flc"><span style="font-family: Arial;"> </span></span><span style="font-family: Georgia; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span><span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>Research shows L-Taurine is a safe, effective adjunct to conventional medications in most people with epilepsy. You can find this in any health food store. The dose is supposed to be 3 capsules a day, in divided doses, total of 1500 mg. Source: </span><span style="color: black; font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><a href="http://www.drlera.com/epilepsy.htm"><span style="color: #0000cc;">http://www.drlera.com/epilepsy.htm</span></a></span><span style="display: none; font-family: Georgia; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial; mso-hide: all;"><br style="mso-special-character: line-break;" /></span><span class="flc"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"></span></span></li><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt; mso-list: l2 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Protective Helmet or Headgear</span></u><span style="font-family: Georgia; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">. This may seem an odd gift, but when an autistic person has increased seizure activity, it’s a great thing to have at home, school or Day Programs. Do Internet search under: Protective Head Gear and look under “IMAGES” in search to see what styles and colors are available. Remember, you can buy headgear from martial arts stores and even sport’s stores, so long as they are what will assist in the protection and safety of the autistic person in mind.</span><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"> </span></li><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt; mso-list: l2 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Floor Mats</span></u><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">. </span><span style="font-family: Georgia; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">For kids: Do Internet search under: “Alphabet and Number Floor Mat.” For Teens or Adults look for something more sturdy. Do Internet Search under: “Folding Gym Mat” or “Tumbling Mats.” Look under “Images” so you can SEE what they look like.</span><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 11pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;"> *</span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>* I place padded floor mat on wall of my autistic son’s bed, tucked behind bed, pushed up against wall. It acts as a noise buffer and protective cover in event he had a seizure or was self-abusing, he won’t hit hard wall. It’s also good to have mats inside bathrooms, to avoid falls on hard flooring or tile. I bought mats at Garden Area of Home Depot and put 3 of them in bathroom. They’re waterproof and provide protection in event of fall. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt 0.25in;"><span style="font-family: Georgia; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">5. </span><u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Music</span></u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">. </span><span style="font-family: Georgia; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Buy a Mozart CD</span><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;"> or tape. </span><span style="font-family: Georgia; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Listening to <u>Mozart’s piano concertos for eight minutes a day</u> can reduce the frequency of seizures in young epilepsy patients by 30 percent, showed a study by Kaohsiung Medical University (KMU).</span><span style="font-family: Arial;"> </span><cite><span style="color: blue; font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1525505011002800">www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1525505011002800</a></span></cite></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;"></span><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">For Autistic Individuals with Self-Injurious Behavior or other Behavioral Challenges:</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><ol style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo2; tab-stops: list .5in;"><u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">Protective gear</span></u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">.</span><span style="font-family: Georgia;"> See above. Also, boxing helmets that cover ears. ALSO consider protective gear for arms, legs, hands. You can find this stuff at any sport’s store or ON-LINE by searching and analyzing different types of protective gear available. Martial art’s stores seem to have a lot of excellent choices. </span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><ol start="2" style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="color: #0e774a; margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo2; tab-stops: list .5in;"><u><span style="color: windowtext; font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">Arm Compression sleeves</span></u><span style="color: windowtext; font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">. </span><span style="color: windowtext; font-family: Georgia;">Many autistics with self-injurious behavior are tactically defensive. Arm compression sleeves may help.</span><span style="color: windowtext; font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;"> </span><span style="color: black; font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><a href="http://tulane.edu/asvpr/upload/Barrett-LL.pdf"><span style="color: #0000cc;">http://tulane.edu/asvpr/upload/Barrett-LL.pdf</span></a>. You can find more information about this: </span><cite><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><a href="http://www.abledata.com/abledata.cfm?pageid=113582&amp;orgid=109562"><span style="color: blue;"/feeds/posts/default/gtwwwabledatacom/abledata_pageid_113582_ampamporgid_109562_ltspan__gt__lta__gt.___ltspan__gt__ltcite__gt__ltspan_style_.html"color: windowtext; font-family: Georgia;">You can FIND arm compression sleeves at sport’s stores or ON-LINE by searching under “arm compression sleeves.” I have used this and it does seem to help calm our son during times of increased self-abusive behaviors. Best applied the second the behavior starts to increase, as once it starts, it may become rapid, obsessive-compulsive behavior and it can be hard to get on sleeves at this point. It does NOT restrict movement, but offers sensory support. Mitigating sensory dysfunction is one key element in reducing self-injury in autistic person.</span><cite><span style="color: windowtext; font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">&nbsp;<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;<strong>TEMPLE GRANDIN</strong>, Ph.D. <b>...</b> deep pressure applied by foam-padded splints[or some type of compression]&nbsp;on arms reduced <b>self</b>-<b>injurious behavior</b> and self-stimulation in an autistic child.<br /><div><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;">www.<b>grandin</b>.com/inc/squeeze.html</span></cite></div></span></span></cite><cite><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"></span></cite></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><ol start="3" style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo2; tab-stops: list .5in;"><u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">Leg Compression sleeves</span></u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">. </span><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Same therapeutic reasons as noted above. Great for autistics who walk a lot and may have pain or soreness in legs. Any discomfort, soreness or pain is a known trigger to self-injurious behaviors in autism. </span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><ol start="4" style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo2; tab-stops: list .5in;"><u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">Cooling Vests/Cold Therapy</span></u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">. </span><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Here’s what one occupational therapist says about cooling vest for special needs persons with self-injurious or aggressive behaviors:</span><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;"> </span><b><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 11pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">“</span></b><u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 11pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold;">Kool Max cooling vest</span></u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 11pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold;"> has helped reduce frequency and intensity of self injurious and aggressive behaviors in adults with developmental disabilities I serve. The cooling vest has helped prevent people from escalating into 'Fight or Flight' mode in the adults with developmental disabilities... The cooling vest makes bus rides to work in the summer much more bearable and has cut down on self injurious and aggressive behaviors in the adults with developmental disabilities I serve."<b> Source: <a href="http://www.polarsoftice.com/testimonials.html">http://www.polarsoftice.com/testimonials.html</a>.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span>You can find products to buy here: <a href="http://www.polarsoftice.com/bodycoolingsystems.html">http://www.polarsoftice.com/bodycoolingsystems.html</a>.</b></span><span style="font-family: Georgia;"> What I like about cooling vests is they may double as a weighted vest, which provides additional sensory support to autistic individual. Polar Products seems a reliable, good place to buy quality product. Drug stores also carry cold packs, but don’t always have ones you need. Also consider:<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span></span><span style="font-family: Georgia; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Many autistic individuals with behavioral challenges tighten their muscles. So theoretically, neck or cervical spine can become tight and painful.<span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>Providing cold therapy seems safe and effective. A great practical gift. </span><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"></span></li><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo2; tab-stops: list .5in;"><u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">Weighted Blankets</span></u><span style="font-family: Georgia;">. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>Research shows weighted blankets provide sensory support for children and adults with autism. We have two weighted blankets that do&nbsp;HELP calm our autistic son if he begins to punch self. Please note you NEVER, EVER cover a child’s head with a weighted blanket. It’s meant to go up to shoulders. I seldom see warnings about this on any site selling these blankets.</span><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 11pt;"> <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>To find the same durable, colorful blanket we use: <a href="http://www.mansionathletics.com/vinyl-weighted-blanket-w41177-sensory-integration-weighted-blankets.html?channelid=Google%20Products">http://www.mansionathletics.com/vinyl-weighted-blanket-w41177-sensory-integration-weighted-blankets.html?channelid=Google%20Products</a></span><span style="font-family: Georgia;"></span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.5in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo2; tab-stops: list .5in; text-indent: -0.25in;"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Georgia; mso-fareast-font-family: Georgia;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">6.<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">First Aid Kit. </span></u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-family: Georgia;">A basic first aid kit is helpful to have around for minor cuts. Over the years, I have noticed my son, along with other severely-autistic children and adults have frequent cuts and abrasions on their legs, arms and hands. This is because they may fall to knees on the ground during a meltdown, bite self or scrape into things. A basic first aid kit, which includes many Band-Aids and Anti-biotic Ointment, is a thoughtful, practical gift.</span><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;"> </span><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Find them on-line by searching under “basic first aid kits.” Drugs stores also carry kits.</span><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;"> </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><ol start="7" style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo2; tab-stops: list .5in;"><u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">Therapeutic Swing</span></u><span style="font-family: Georgia;">. Of course, you wouldn’t give this gift to the autistic individual who likes to throw things or turn things upside down. Or maybe it would help. Just things to consider. Every autistic has his or her own personality traits. Search under: “cuddle swings autism” or “swings for autism.” Occupational Therapist sites can give ideas, as well, as they use swings for vestibular therapy. </span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">Other Gifts to Consider</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.5in; mso-list: l1 level1 lfo3; tab-stops: list .5in; text-indent: -0.25in;"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Georgia; mso-fareast-font-family: Georgia;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">1.<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">Offer to baby-sit or provide respite care night out for parents. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.5in; mso-list: l1 level1 lfo3; tab-stops: list .5in; text-indent: -0.25in;"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Georgia; mso-fareast-font-family: Georgia;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">2.<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">Provide gift card so school, program or the parents can purchase what they need for autistic individual. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.5in; mso-list: l1 level1 lfo3; tab-stops: list .5in; text-indent: -0.25in;"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Georgia; mso-fareast-font-family: Georgia;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">3.<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;">Clothing. Pick out stylish, quality, comfortable clothing. Put together an outfit. Search under: natural, tagless, seamless clothing. Also GAP, Hanes and other major brand stores offer this type of clothing. </span></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-7828773359296002211?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com1tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-57260381125523559542012-03-07T18:49:00.000-08:002012-03-07T18:49:20.053-08:00Seven signs of a bad caregiver or nurse<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;7</span> Signs of a BAD Caregiver or Nurse:</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><ol style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;">Can’t get off phone</span></u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;">. </span><span style="font-family: Georgia;">This type of caregiver is always on the cell phone. Constantly speaking on phone while getting PAID to protect and monitor elderly or disabled patients is disrespectful and unprofessional. There are rare exceptions. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>For instance, my severely-autistic son is obsessed with walking. If a day shift nurse is walking 5-plus hours outside with my son, I don’t mind if nurse chats on a <u>hands free cell phone</u>, because it helps break the monotony.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span>However, if I observe a nurse arguing on phone, or otherwise distracted from my son’s needs—as in one case when I witnessed my son pick up leaves off ground and stuff them in his mouth, and the nurse <u>didn’t even notice</u>, no more hands free cell, it’s over. A GOOD caregiver or nurse doesn’t use their cell phone during a shift, unless it’s a necessary and urgent communication. Or a special circumstance as noted above. </span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.5in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in; text-indent: -0.25in;"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Georgia; mso-fareast-font-family: Georgia;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">2.<span style="font: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;">Can’t stop texting</span></u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;">: </span><span style="font-family: Georgia;">This caregiver is always texting. This is WORSE than talking on cell phone. Why? Because caregiver’s hands aren’t ready to react quickly, in the event a patient, let’s say, like my autistic son, suddenly hits self, bolts into street, eats foreign objects, or touches something hot. Texting takes the person’s hands, eyes and focus OFF client or patient. The can’t stop texting caregiver is pre-occupied with his or her own issues, instead of doing the job they are PAID for, which is to be involved <u>in the patient’s issues</u>. The can’t- stop-texting caregiver is better suited to work as a Text Chat Operator. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>A GOOD caregiver or nurse does not constantly text while on duty.</span><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;"> </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.5in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in; text-indent: -0.25in;"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Georgia; mso-fareast-font-family: Georgia;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">3.<span style="font: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;">Can’t shut-up</span></u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;">. </span><span style="font-family: Georgia;">This caregiver shows up to work and the first thing isn’t to ask how the patient is doing, but to launch into a rapid flow of chit-chat about a variety of subjects <u>other than patient status, needs and care.</u> Or they sit down and begin talking about personal problems. “My day was so awful,” they might say. And then waste 25 minutes going on about what happened. They may also ramble about who they saw, what they ate, or how they did something. There is no end to the talking. To them, it’s as if they’ve just arrived to a social support group. It’s unknown what the etiology of the can’t-shut-up personality is. It could be Bi-Polar or ADHD. The bottom line is: A GOOD caregiver comes to work and asks how patient is doing, what meds were given, what patient health and behavioral status is. There is always time for a little talk later, which is fine, and nice, so long as it isn’t burdening family members or delaying other nurses coming off shift. A GOOD caregiver or nurse is focused on patient care and doesn’t burden others with non-stop talking.</span><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;"> </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.5in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in; text-indent: -0.25in;"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Georgia; mso-fareast-font-family: Georgia;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">4.<span style="font: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;">Always late</span></u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;">. </span><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Not occasional lateness. This type is ALWAYS late. I’m talking 15-30 minutes late. You know the type. And there is always a ridiculous, dramatic excuse, as if they’ve got an excuse list they play off. A GOOD caregiver or nurse is nearly always on time.</span><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;"> </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.5in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in; text-indent: -0.25in;"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Georgia; mso-fareast-font-family: Georgia;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">5.<span style="font: 7pt 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;">Always asking for something</span></u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;">. </span><span style="font-family: Georgia;">NOT occasional asking. ALWAYS asking. <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Can I have my check early? Can I borrow this or that from your house?</i> (I worry about this type because now you’re wondering if they’re scoping out personal stuff in the home). <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Can I get off early? Can I come in later? I forgot my lunch, do you mind if I eat some of your food? Do you mind if I take a shower here? Do you mind if I bring along my friend? Can I bring my Christmas presents to wrap? Can I use your air compressor, I have a flat tire? Can you drive to the nearest hardware store and pick me up some jumper cables, my battery is dead. Gosh, I wish I had a home like this, you’re so lucky </i>(coveting the home or things of a patient is a major RED FLAG). These are actually things bad caregivers and nurses have said in the past. Nurses that no longer work with our autistic son. If I can spare ONE family the misery, I’m happy. A GOOD caregiver or nurse never BURDENS or BADGERS family with constant requests, personal wants or repeatedly asks for special favors. </span><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><ol start="6" style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;">Got no skills</span></u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;">. </span><span style="font-family: Georgia;">This caregiver or nurse is a puzzling presentation. The caregiver may have 13 years experience and a degree from a nursing school, but they don’t know how to give oxygen, don’t understand what a seizure is and don’t understand how to give medications with food (i.e.. they plop whole pills onto a spoon with peanut butter and stuff in patient’s mouth, with the peanut butter stuck on palate, patient gagging, and they keep stuffing more peanut butter in—just clueless). Don’t bathe or clean patient properly. This type of caregiver’s idea of a bath is a 5-minute shower where water falls off the body and then it’s out, towel dry, and on goes a sprinkle of powder. They don’t know how to change a diaper. Diaper is always half on, too loose or too tight. They can’t write proper nursing notes. Don’t understand ambulation therapy (walking) with a patient. Don’t know how to assist a patient in and out bed, bath or cars. Don’t understand how to monitor side effects of medications. A GOOD caregiver or nurse has got GOOD skills. Skills like health monitoring, personal care, patient safety, wound care, nutritional knowledge, medication management and patient assistance. Skills they practice; take pride in and improve on. </span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><ol start="7" style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;">Bad Attitude</span></u><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;">. </span><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Easily offended. Constantly depressed. Constantly complains. No sense of humor. Negative. Families living with a disabled or elderly relative who requires constant care are often tired, cynical and depressed enough. They don’t need someone paid to help, entering the home and tripling the stress. Any caregiver or nurse that views the patient in a negative light or says negative things about the patient’s health status--should be terminated. Also, nurses who judge or gossip about patient or family are bad people to have around.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span>You can’t trust them. They aren’t loyal. Nurses and caregivers are expected to protect the privacy of both patient and family.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span>A GOOD caregiver or nurse is always positive and displays a helpful, supportive personality. Above all, a good caregiver is always the patient’s cheerleader. Cheering for hope, healing, comfort and happiness. Indeed, a positive, uplifting attitude about patient is so critical, I’d tolerate a can’t-shut-up or always late nurse, as long as they were good in every other way, with my son. That’s how much I value a positive, uplifting attitude. </span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Finally, remember there are more GOOD caregivers and nurses than BAD ones. It’s equally important to remember BAD ones can seriously harm or kill your loved one. So don’t be too cynical or too naïve. A family should honor and respect good caregivers and nurses. Little things matter. I keep a candy jar in my son’s room for nurses. I thank nurses for good things done with my son. A GOOD caregiver or nurse is a blessing. Treat them well. Hopefully, this list will provide insight into securing GOOD caregivers for your precious loved one. </span></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-5726038112552355954?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com1tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-60875670370301925132012-03-06T13:58:00.014-08:002012-03-08T10:49:51.321-08:00To Catch A Bad Caregiver: A Reality Show Idea<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a>How Long Will the USA Tolerate Senseless Abuse and Neglect of Disabled Persons Residing in State and Federally-&nbsp;Funded, Out of Home Placements? <br /><br /><b>Man</b> accused of <b>beating autistic</b> adult with metal spoon <b>...</b> Plowden was a worker at a <b>group home</b> run by the May Center for <b>Autism</b> Spectrum <b>...Jan 3, 2012</b><br /><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;">claytodayonline.com/.../250-<b>man</b>-accused-of-<b>beating</b>-<b>autistic</b>-adult-with-<wbr>metal-spoon</span></cite><span class="flc"> </span><br /><br /><span class="flc">Aug 4, 2011<b>...</b> the December death of an agitated 27-year-old <b>autistic man</b> under his <b>...</b> <br />shows culmination of a pattern of abuse and <strong>neglect. </strong><span style="color: #0e774a;">www.silive.com/eastshore/.../kin_cite_abuse_and_</span><span style="color: #0e774a;"><strong>neglect</strong>_in.html</span><span class="flc"> -</span></span><br /><br /><span class="flc"><span class="flc">Time and again, when Bucks County investigators asked how a helpless, <b>autistic</b> <br /><b>man</b> had been left to die last month in a sweltering, parked <b>...nobody could answer why.</b><br /><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;">articles.philly.com/.../24971118_1_heat-death-<b>autistic</b>-<b>man</b>-care-dependent-<wbr><b>person</b></span></cite></span></span><br /><br /><span class="flc">Feb 2, 2012 <strong>...</strong> Local woman denies locking <strong>autistic man</strong> in basement <strong>...</strong> Marcia Morris, 64, is <br />charged with reckless abuse, <strong>neglect</strong> or abandonment of a <strong>...</strong><strong><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;"><a href="http://www.wyomingnews.com/articles/2012/02/02/.../19local_02-02-12.txt">www.wyomingnews.com/articles/2012/02/02/.../19local_02-02-12.txt</a></span></cite><span class="flc"> - </span></strong></span><br /><br /><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;">Aug 3, 2010 <b>...</b> The Woods Services is a treatment home for those who have <b>autism</b> and other <br />disabilities . A 20 year old <b>man</b> died because he was left in a hot car&nbsp;<b>...</b></div><div><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;"><a href="http://www.examiner.com/.../counselor-charged-with-neglect-and-manslaughter-after-autistic-man-dies">www.examiner.com/.../counselor-charged-with-<b>neglect</b>-and-<b>mans</b>laughter-<wbr>after-<b>autistic</b>-<b>man</b>-dies</a></span></cite></div><br /><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;"><span style="color: black;"><strong>Caregiver</strong> Charged With Hitting <b>Autistic Woman</b> <b>...</b> <span style="color: blue;">May 11, 2001</span>: Man Charged <br />With <b>Abusing Autistic Woman</b>; May 11, 2001: Arrest Made In Autistic <b>Abuse</b> Case <b>...</b></span><cite><a href="http://www.thebostonchannel.com/news/769426/detail.html">www.thebostonchannel.com/news/769426/detail.html</a></cite><span class="flc"> - </span></span></cite><br /><br /><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;"><span class="flc"><span style="color: #4272db;"><span style="color: black;">KentuckyFormer <b>caregiver</b> pleads guilty to <b>abusing autistic</b> teen <b>....</b> July 26, 2011</span></span></span></span></cite><br /><br /><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;"><span class="flc"><span style="color: #4272db;"><span style="color: black;">Nov 11, 2008 <b>...</b> Voiceless and abused. <b>Woman</b> allegedly raped by <b>caregiver</b> may have <b>....</b> <br />assault for allegedly attacking an <b>autistic</b> teenager at another facility.<br /><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;">o.seattlepi.com/local/387252_rape11.html</span></cite><span class="flc"> </span></span></span></span></span></cite><br /><br /><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;"><span class="flc"><span style="color: #4272db;"><span style="color: black;"><span class="flc">Jun 14, 2011 <b>...</b> Disabled Children <b>Abused</b> and Beaten in State Institutions · <b>Caregiver</b> Charged <br />in Death of <b>Autistic</b> Man Was [pre-occupied] with&nbsp;Using Her Cell Phone</span></span></span></span></span></cite><br /><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;"><span class="flc"><span style="color: #4272db;"><span style="color: black;"></span><br /><span style="color: black;">The caretaker of an <b>autistic</b> patient has been charged after a videotape showed <br />him hitting the <b>man</b> with a plastic hammer. <b>...</b> By Pearce Adams; Anderson <br />Independent Mail; Posted July 31, <b>2008</b> </span></span></span></span></cite><br /><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;"><span class="flc"><span style="color: #4272db;"><br />Jul 30, 2008 <b>...</b> <span style="color: black;"><b>Man</b> Accused Of <b>Abusing Autistic</b> Client <b>...</b>&nbsp;&nbsp; Parents Use Camera To Catch <b>Caregiver Abusing</b> Son <b>...</b><br /><cite><a href="http://www.wyff4.com/news/17041320/detail.html">www.wyff4.com/<b>news</b>/17041320/detail.html</a></cite><span class="flc"> -</span></span><br /><br /><span style="color: black;">&nbsp; </span><br /><br /><span style="color: black;"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 12pt; mso-ansi-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-fareast-language: EN-US;">Washington Post, <span style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;"><u>March 14, 1999</u>; "</span></span>Elroy lives here. Tiny, half-blind, mentally retarded, 39-year-old Elroy. To find him, go past the counselor flirting on the phone. Past the broken chairs, the roach-dappled kitchen and the housemates whose neglect in this group home has been chronicled for a decade in the files of city agencies. Head upstairs to Elroy's single bed”. </span></span><br /><span style="color: black;"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 12pt; mso-ansi-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-fareast-language: EN-US;">Source: By Katherine Boo <u>Washington Post</u> 3/14/1999. Staff Writer</span><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: 12pt; mso-ansi-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-fareast-language: EN-US;"> </span><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman'; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-fareast-language: EN-US;">Sunday<u>, </u>Page A01<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><br /><br /><br /><br /><span class="flc">ENOUGH is ENOUGH. </span><br /><br /><u>Here's an idea for an American Reality TV show:</u> It could be called, "TO Catch a&nbsp;Dangerous caregiver."&nbsp; The reason I say dangerous and not bad, is because a caregiver can be bad, just lazy, etc..and not be a threat to patient health and safety. A dangerous caregiver however, is someone who fails to perform duties necessary to preserve life and health. Ie...NOT giving medications, but lists in nursing/caregiving notes, that they gave meds. Or,&nbsp;Lists that they put lotion on patient or turned patient, but they didn't. and patient ends up getting bed sores that lead to sepsis infection that leads to death. Or a dangerious caregiver is someone who doesn't monitor patients respirations, but says in chart they do. Or they steal patient's medications or medical supplies. These people are hard to catch. You have to KNOW what to look for and what's expected for these people in their line of work. </span></span></span></cite>&nbsp; <br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in; text-indent: -0.25in;"><span class="flc"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: Arial;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">1.<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></span></span></span><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Mar 12, 2011 <b>...</b> A <b>group home</b> in Hudson Falls, N.Y., where a worker was said to have sexually <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span>assaulted a <b>...</b> A Case <b>History</b>: Roger Macomber <b>...</b> over the past year has found <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span>widespread problems in the more than 2000 <u><b>state</b>-<b>run</b></u> homes. <cite><span style="color: #0e774a;">www.nytimes.com/2011/03/13/nyregion/13<b>homes</b>.html</span></cite></span></div><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Here’s how it could go down. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>Okay, I’m no expert in this, but it seems a reasonable place to start brainstorming. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><ol style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Put out ad for caregivers for <u>non-verbal</u>, severely-disabled or elderly patients on-line and in newspaper ads. </span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><ol start="2" style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Caregivers are interviewed on phone by actors posing as family members of patient.</span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><ol start="3" style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">At no time are caregivers persuaded or coerced in any manner to do job. They are given an opportunity to work. If they choose to later commit a crime, it’s because they are willing and able to commit crime, given the right setting, and choose to do so. </span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><ol start="4" style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Caregiver is invited to home, for a trial patient care shift. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>Job is a private-duty job. (Caregiver is not working for an agency. They are hired directly by family, a common practice throughout USA). </span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><ol start="5" style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;"><span style="color: black;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>Actor/actresses pose as fragile elderly or severely-disabled patients. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span></span></span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><ol start="6" style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">An hour after caregiver arrives for shift, they are told will be left alone with patient, while family goes shopping for the day. Will be back much later. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>Or you could tell them before they arrive, they will be there alone. </span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><ol start="7" style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Prior to family leaving, caregivers are again reminded of SPECIFIC, strict instructions as to what their job is when they are there. Hence, there’s no confusion of what they are expected to do. </span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><ol start="8" style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Medications (fake) are expected to be given. Special foods, etc...Making Medication errors and stealing meds from patients is not uncommon in bad caregivers. </span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><ol start="9" style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Family takes off. Patient’s room is filled with nice things. </span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><ol start="10" style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;"><span style="color: black;">Cameras are all over house. Watching caregiver’s every move. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span></span></span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Sure, this stuff isn’t as exciting as Dancing with Stars, but let me remind you, every single person reading this, either knows or will know of someone who needs respite care, at some point in life. It could be your grandma, father or auntie. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">How many caregivers could be caught BEFORE they seriously harm or kill severely-disabled or elderly persons? And we have to read about it in news. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">How many sting operations have been done to address the epidemic of abuse and neglect of disabled and elderly in home health and out of home placement settings? We find sting operations busting prostitutes and drug dealers, but we aren’t going after people who abuse and neglect disabled and elderly? What the hell is wrong with this picture? It’s easier to bust prostitutes. It takes more to catch a bad caregiver. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">A reality show like this is way over due. For years, we have read countless news stories illuminating senseless abuse and neglect of disabled and elderly in this country. For years, not much has changed. This will not change, and in fact will become worse, if we do not expose and catch dangerous caregivers. A reality show is a great place to start catching. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">I recall an investigative news piece about chickens being abused. Are we concerned about abuse and neglect of humans in this country? I’m so sick of watching news and reading reports of abuse and neglect of autistic and other vulnerable populations. Nothing is changing. People want to see change. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>One reason it’s not changing is because people aren’t sure how to handle this. Or do a sting operation. You’ve got privacy laws, nursing agency involvement, etc...</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Abuse and neglect of disabled occurs across settings. However, because of the isolated setting of home health care, caregivers <u>most likely to abuse will seek out positions where there is little, if any monitoring</u>. That’s where private duty care comes up. Private duty care is where a nurse isn’t working through a nursing agency, though abusive caregivers can and do work inside nursing agencies, group homes, nursing homes, state hospitals and Developmental Centers. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Sting operation involving caregivers working Private Duty Care positions is therefore, least likely to become a legal nightmare for a network. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">A reality show like this wouldn’t be looking for MINOR things, by the way. Nobody is mad when a caregiver is picking their nose, eating 4 candy bars they brought for themselves or answering an occasional text. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">The show would be honing in on caregiver behavior that is an imminent and exigent circumstance, a clear threat to patient safety. It could be the caregiver is specifically told the patient could “aspirate.” Or has subtle seizures that must be monitored. If then, let’s say, during sting you observe this caregiver glued to a computer screen the entire shift, not once checking on patient, they’re showing patient neglect. Or you observe caregiver stealing controlled substances like Valium or pain medications (all fake on show, of course to reduce liability).</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;"><span style="color: black;">So that’s it. That’s my pitch. I don’t see any other way to reduce the mindless abuse and neglect of autistic and other vulnerable populations. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span></span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black;"><br /></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black;">See You Tube video: “Bad Caregiver of Autistic Young Adult Caught on Tape” to get a small sample of what you may find when observing caregivers in a home health setting. CATCHING THE dangerous employees who work with vulnerable citizens&nbsp;is what is needed BEFORE we read more headlines on the neverending abuse and neglect. </span><br /><br /><span style="color: black;">Current laws protecting disabled aren't working. Obviously. Hence, the idea of submitting a bill to congress that would force state and federally funded homes serving this population to have cameras installed for PROTECTING this vulnerable population supercedes idiotic privacy laws that stop the use of cameras. When you walk into a bank or a 7-11 you're on camera, but somehow&nbsp;it's a violation of privacy to protect disabled people who can't speak for themselves inside state run group homes and hospitals/ Oh please. </span></div><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in; text-indent: -0.25in;"><span class="flc"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: Arial;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">1.<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-6087567037030192513?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-51173272856388417872012-03-03T17:56:00.012-08:002012-04-08T11:23:16.714-07:00No Justice for Severely-Autistic Adult in California<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a><br /><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><strong><span lang="EN" style="color: #3a3a3a; font-family: Georgia;">To understand this case see the Feb 24th, 2012&nbsp;story:&nbsp;“<u>Basic Police Work Ignored in Autistic Patient’s Suspicious Death</u>”, written by Ryan Gabrielson of California Watch. Or watch video titled, “<u>Manner of Death Undetermined</u>” on You Tube. </span></strong></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><strong><span lang="EN" style="color: #3a3a3a; font-family: Georgia;">If you’ve ever wondered what happens to severely-autistic people as they age, in the absence of adequate care and support, this is an eye-opener. The following excerpts are based on true, factual events, with a few speculations woven in. </span></strong></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><strong><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;">Van Ingraham is a severely- autistic man who had his neck broken in 2006, while living at Fairview Hospital, one of California’s Developmental Center’s that serves the <u>forgotten population of adults with severe autism and behavioral issues</u>. </span></strong></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><strong><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;">Johannes Sotingco is a caregiver on duty the morning Van’s neck is broken.</span></strong></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><strong><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;">Supervisor—if you can stomach calling her a supervisor— Florens Limbong, is also on duty. </span></strong></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><strong><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;">Sotingco’s shift began at 10:30 pm that night. &nbsp;He works an 8hr shift, so it ends at 6:30am. </span></strong></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><strong><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;">At around 1:00 am, that June 6<sup>th</sup>, 2006, Limbong recalls Van is up from bed, pants wet. It is unclear who changes him. Either Sontingco or another caregiver named Tan. </span></strong></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><strong><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;">For the next 2 ½ hours, Van is reportedly up again, up and down the hallways, banging on nurse’s windows, making noises, pulling down pants, etc…His normal antics, by no fault of his own. He’s severely-autistic, remember. </span></strong></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><strong><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;">Cargiver Sotingco has to “re-direct” Van <u>several times during this 2 ½ hr period</u>. <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">It must have been mentally and physically exhausting</i>. <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Had Sotingco been sleep deprived? Nobody in charge of investigating this case at Fairview probably has ever asked.</i> </span></strong></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><strong><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;">About 3:30am, Van is reportedly back in bed. <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Sontingco can finally get a break. So he thinks.</i> &nbsp;It won’t be long before Van is up again. </span></strong></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><strong><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;">Around 4:20 am, Sotingco is told he needs to clean up another client’s “smeared feces” in another room. &nbsp;<i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Surely the thought of cleaning up someone else’s fecal matter, added to the internal stress saturating Sotingco’s evening.</i></span></strong></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><strong><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;">Around the same time, Van pops up again, apparently having again urinated in his pants. Sotingco must’ve been fuming<i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">. My life is nothing but shit and piss. He starts to look at Van and the man with feces on his hands as sub-human. He is growing fed up with this job. He’s been doing it a long time. Surely, he is better than this. Screw these retards, he’s thinking (please note I say this based on media reports and years of listening to people who care for the severely-disabled. They say things like this). I’m sick of them all. Tired of the piss and shit, dressing, feeding; cutting toe nails.&nbsp;</i></span></strong></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><strong><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;">Back in Van’s room again, when nobody is looking, Sotingco orders Van to pull up his pants. He thinks about the “smeared feces” waiting for him in the other room. <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Damn it. I’m so sick of this. Just pull up your damn pants you idiot</i>! He <u>gives Van a final warning</u>. “Get your pants on!” Van, terrified by Sontingco’s tone, freezes in fear, does not comply. Sotingco can no longer take it. Sontingco SNAPS.</span></strong></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><strong><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;">Sotingco moving behind Van, grabs Van with one arm, &nbsp;yanks Van by the back of his hair, with opposite arm, pushes on his back, hyperextending Van’s neck, then thrusts Van &nbsp;forward, in an awkward position, forcing Van to face the ground to see where his pants are by his ankles. &nbsp;“See your pants at your ankles!” Sotingco quietly yells into Van’s ear. “Pull up your pants.” &nbsp;Van still doesn’t comply. Sontingco, Van’s hair clenched in his fist, begins to violently shake Van’s head back and forth. </span></i></strong><strong><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; font-weight: normal;">Van screams.</span></i></strong><strong><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;"> </span></i></strong></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><strong><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;">Sotingco takes him to ground (he uses an approved technique with a new twist), trying to quiet him.</span></i></strong><strong><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;"> “<i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Shut up!” he tells Van.</i> A blind man, nearby, hears the entire scenario go down. Van stops screaming. Sontingco settles into a calm, charming and covertly cruel demeanor, as if this isn’t the first time he’s had to show one of <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">these idiots </i>who the heck is <u>in charge</u>. <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">After all, <u>he’s not paid enough for this kind of work</u>.</i> <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">It’s <u>not his fault </u>these imbeciles are so screwed up. It’s what life dealt them. Why can’t they <u>do as they’re told</u>! Sontingco is a classic abuser type. Finds work with vulnerable people. Has a dual personality. Charming, but covertly cruel. He will NEVER acknowledge the damage he does, did or will do. Not even when he’s caught and thrown into a cell for the rest of his life. </i></span></strong></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Fact: Johannes <u>Sotingco has previously been investigated four times</u> for his work as a caregiver at Metropolitan State Hospital.&nbsp; But Fairview hired him anyway. Probably because each time, he had evaded charges of abusing disabled clients.&nbsp;&nbsp;Sotingco appears an&nbsp;amazing con man who finds places to hide and SURROUNDS himself with submissive, sub-intellectual appointed and hired co-workers, who don’t know how to spot a guy like Sontingco or bring&nbsp;this piece of work&nbsp;to justice. </span></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><strong><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;">So when VAN SCREAMS. Limbong&nbsp;had run&nbsp;in. She finds Sotingco standing over Van. She doesn’t think much of it, because she’s not the thinking type. She blows it off, probably goes back to texting, chatting, checking her Facebook, or answering personal emails. </span></strong></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><strong><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;">A little bit later, Sotingco, pretty sure he’s really hurt Van now, reports Van fell and--LATER--will pretend that's how he&nbsp;broke neck. &nbsp;<u>Sotingco blames (abusers always blame) Van’s alleged fall on his behavior</u> of wetting self and running around, though there is no evidence of urine on floor, and NO EXTERNAL INJURIES showing a fall likely occurred the morning of neck being broken. </span></strong><br /><strong><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;"><br /></span></strong></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><strong><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;">Despite the fact Van can’t move his neck isn’t drinking or walking, which is way off Van’s baseline behavior, Sotingco tries to cover his ass and phones in Van’s injury as “injury of unknown origin”. Limbong doesn’t dispute this. She’s submissive type,&nbsp;in a world of her own, waiting for the next paycheck to roll in, as the next patient rolls out, in a body bag.&nbsp; The kind of person the Sotingco's of the world rely on so things are largely ignored. </span></strong></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><strong><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;">Van in a state nobody can deny at this point, is taken to hospital where neck X-rays show he has suffered an injury <u>unlikely caused by a fall</u>. So what happened then? </span></strong></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><strong><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-weight: normal;">MRI of cervical spine shows: “</span></strong><span style="font-family: Georgia;">dislocation of C5 on C6 with bilateral --facet block, severe central stenosis and cord compressions through C4 through C6, disruption of ligamentum nuchae in C6-C7, prevertebral and epidural hematoma underlying congenital spinal stenosis.” </span></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">A doctor says this TYPE of injury occurs when the head is <u>pushed forward</u> and the <u>body was pushed back</u> with a force great enough to dislocate the vertebrae. Dr. Dobkin said it was not likely that the injury was caused by a fall or self inflicted due to the severity of the dislocation. </span></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">There is also NO evidence of congenital force or osteoporosis, which could explain a fall causing such injury to neck. </span></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">There IS however types of fracture dislocations seen on Van’s tests that are usually caused when the head is bent forward and the back is compressed. “Put on your pants Van!” “See them at your ankles.” &nbsp;Those kinds of things usually occur when someone is hit. </span></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">The lead investigator on Fairview’s side, was a woman named Theresa DePue, a registered nurse, who has never previously investigated a suspicious death.</span></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Sotingco and Limbong insist Van must have fallen. <em>Blame. Blame. Blame. Anything but ourselves. </em></span></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Investigators from Fairview, those brilliant minds,&nbsp;didn’t swab anything for fingerprints or for any DNA evidence. They did no basic police work on the scene.</span></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Three medical experts said the 50-year-old </span><span style="font-family: Georgia;">autistic </span><span style="font-family: Georgia;">patient, Van Ingraham, likely had <br />been killed. </span></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">NO arrests have been made, though the state paid Van Ingraham’s brother $800,000 in a wrongful death suit.&nbsp;</span></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Johannes Sotingco has FOUR prior suspected abuse of client reports filed against him. Johannes Sotingco acknowledged that he was with Van at the time when Van screamed; he acknowledged altering records within 48 hours of the injury</span><span style="font-family: Georgia;">. Still, he's&nbsp;never been arrested. </span></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">WHERE IS THE JUSTICE?&nbsp; Arrest Sotingco. </span></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Meanwhile, FORGET stupid privacy laws. If my autistic son were in a state institution or group home,&nbsp;I would&nbsp;WANT (or install)&nbsp;hidden surveillance in every room he was in. In fact, I submit that should be a NEW law on the books. MANDATORY 24 -hour survilleance cameras&nbsp;in every room of every state institution where vulnerable disabled persons are. The videos would be carefully protected, so they don't fall into hands of people who don't need to see them. They should be there for cases like this, when nobody was there to protect Van Ingraham. God bless Larry Ingraham, a retired San Diego Police Officer.&nbsp;What a great man. What an incredible,&nbsp;loving brother. What an inspirational advocate for severely-autistic adults. </span></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">May God restore all the years the locusts have eaten, wash away all the tears that&nbsp;flow from a heart so broken. May God bless and prosper Larry Ingraham and his family and bring to justice those who have harmed his sweet brother.</span></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><br /></div><div style="line-height: 16.6pt;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Kim Oakley, mother of severely-autistic young adult son. </span><br /><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Historical Background of how some caregivers actually <u>BRAG on line about how they "beat retards</u>"...</span><a avglschecked="1236334955S0" href="http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/06/nyregion/boys-death-highlights-crisis-in-homes-for-disabled.html%3Fpagewanted%3Dall&amp;sa=U&amp;ei=5cVVT4f9DbKDsALU8_XiCQ&amp;ved=0CBAQFjAA&amp;usg=AFQjCNGMfvn9cA2jj_-Lfs0dlg2sQd9i7A"><span style="color: #1111cc;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">A <b>Disabled</b> Boy's Death, and a System in Disarray - <b>New York Times</b></span></span></a></span><br /><div class="s"><span style="font-size: x-small;">Jun 5, 2011 <b>...</b> By <b>DANNY HAKIM</b> <b>...</b> June 9, 2011) <b>...</b> <b>abuse</b> of residents within a span of two and a half months;&nbsp; another employee bragged on <b>Facebook</b> about “beating <b>retards</b>.” <b>...</b></span><br /><span style="font-size: x-small;"><b>Lesson: </b></span><br /><span style="font-size: x-small;"><b>Always Check the Facebooks of people hired to work with disabled.</b></span><br /><div><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;">www.<b>nytimes</b>.com/.../boys-death-highlights-crisis-in-homes-for-<b>disabled</b>.html<wbr></wbr></span></cite></div></div></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-5117327285638841787?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com3tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-14009061944629705952012-03-02T12:32:00.004-08:002012-04-08T10:57:02.949-07:00Over-vaccinated Animals, Autism and SIDS<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Over-vaccinated Animals, Autism and SIDS. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">This is not an anti-vaccine article. It's information that anyone can cross check to verify. It's interesting. Things to consider, not to ignore. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">“In veterinary medicine, <u>evidence implicating vaccines</u> triggering immune-mediated and other chronic disorders <u>is compelling</u>,” said Dr. Jean Dodds, a Doctor of Veterinarian Medicine (DVM). </span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Ironically, whenever parents, health advocates or other professionals provide <u>evidence</u> about vaccinations triggering immune-mediated or OTHER chronic [<b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">autism spectrum</b>] disorders, it’s <u>not so compelling</u>. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">In regards to vaccines and animals, Dr. Dodd goes on to say, “The onset of <u>adverse reactions to conventional <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">vaccinations</b></u><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">...can be an immediate hypersensitivity or anaphylactic</b> reaction...which can occur acutely (<b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">24-48 hours</b> afterwards), <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">or later on (10-30 days</b>) or in a <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">delayed type immune response</b> usually caused by immune-complex formation.” &nbsp;</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">So, if my dog has a bad reaction to a vaccine, I could see this reaction anywhere from immediately to 30 days later. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Are vaccines given to humans as risky as vaccines given to animals? While dogs don’t get the identical vaccines as humans, they do receive vaccines with <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">SIMILAR</b> ingredients found in human vaccines (i.e...</span><u><span style="font-family: Georgia;">aluminum</span></u><span style="font-family: Georgia;">, <u>thiomersal</u> [<u>organomercuric</u> compound], <u>formaldehyde</u>, </span><b><span style="font-family: Georgia;">hexavalent chromium</span></b><span style="font-family: Georgia;">, and lead, </span><span style="font-family: Georgia;">paraffin oil, polymers, <u>acrylic</u></span><span style="font-size: 13.5pt;">). </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Haven’t drug manufacturers removed mercury from vaccines? </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">“Although it is now claimed <u>that most dog vaccines do not contain</u> mercury, it is sadly true that most actual <u>doses do contain mercury</u>.” Source: </span><span style="color: black; font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><a href="http://www.alternativevet.org/FAQ_vaccination.htm"><span style="color: #0000cc;">http://www.alternativevet.org/FAQ_vaccination.htm</span></a>.</span><span style="font-family: Verdana;"> I wouldn’t be surprised if human vaccines are still plugged with mercury, as it’s a cheap preservative. But it’s not just mercury that is of concern here. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">While the question whether mercury in vaccines triggers autism is said to have ended, the question of </span><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Delayed onset vaccine-associated anaphylaxis</span></b><span style="font-family: Verdana;">, is just beginning. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Well, I’ve never heard of a delayed onset vaccine-associated anaphylaxis. </span></i></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Just because you haven’t heard it, doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">According to forensic research,</span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 11pt;"> “<b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">A</b></span><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">naphylaxis</span></b><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 11pt;"> shows immediately </span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">or</span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 11pt;"> in few minutes after the [vaccine] exposition; in most of cases by 15-20 minutes. Reactions <u>after 60 minutes from the exposition [also exist]</u>...<b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">More rarely death [following the vaccine] occurs by 24 hours</b>.” </span><span style="color: black; font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><a href="http://www.intechopen.com/download/pdf/pdfs_id/19162"><span style="color: #0000cc;">http://www.intechopen.com/download/pdf/pdfs_id/19162</span></a>.</span><span style="font-size: 11pt;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 11pt;">Theoretically, it’s possible if a baby gets vaccinated at 2pm on a Monday afternoon, they could present with delayed onset anaphylaxis at 2am that night, and be declared dead due to SIDS within <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">24 hours</b>. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 11pt;">How many paramedics, police investigators, doctors or coroners doing a post-mortem examination, consider vaccine associated anaphylaxis in SIDS? </span><span style="font-size: 11pt;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 14pt;">Forensic Case Example</span><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 11pt;">: “</span><span style="font-family: Georgia;">A </span><span style="font-family: Georgia;">fatal case <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">of a 3-month-old female infant, who died within 24 hrs of vaccination with hexavalent vaccine</b> is presented. Clinical data, post-mortem findings (acute pulmonary edema, acute pulmonary emphysema), quali-quantitative data collected from immunohistochemical staining (degranulating mast cells) and laboratory analysis with <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">a high level of beta-tryptase in serum</b>, 43.3 microg/l, allows us to conclude that <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">acute respiratory failure likely due to post hexavalent immunization-related shock was the cause of death</b>.”</span> </div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;">SOURCE: <span class="container"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 11pt;">Forensic Science International</span></span><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 11pt;"> (<span class="year">2008</span>) </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span class="info"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 11pt;">Volume: </span></span><span class="volume"><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 11pt;">179</span></span><span style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 11pt;">, <span class="info">Issue: </span><span class="issue">2-3</span>, <span class="info">Pages: </span><span class="pages">e25-e29 PubMed 18538957</span></span><span class="pages"> OR <a href="http://www.fsijournal.org/article/S0379-0738(08)00180-1/abstract">http://www.fsijournal.org/article/S0379-0738(08)00180-1/abstract</a></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Naturally, Centers for Disease Control downplays the <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">SID and Vaccine connection.</b> </span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">“From 2 to 4 months old, babies begin their primary course of vaccinations. This is also the <u>peak age</u> for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). <u>The timing of these two events has led some people</u> <u>to believe</u> they might be related. However, <u>studies</u> have concluded that vaccinations are not a risk factor for SIDS.” &nbsp;</span><span style="color: black; font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><a href="http://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/Concerns/sids_faq.html"><span style="color: #0000cc;">http://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/Concerns/sids_faq.html</span></a>.</span><span style="font-family: Verdana;"></span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Naturally, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development downplay <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">AUTISM and Vaccine connection:</b></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">&nbsp;“</span><u><span style="color: #231c5c; font-family: Verdana;">Because the symptoms of autism begin to occur around the same time as the child’s MMR vaccination</span></u><span style="color: #231c5c; font-family: Verdana;">, <u>parents</u> and families <u>see</u> the <u>vaccine</u> as the <u>cause</u> of the <u>autism</u>.</span><span style="color: #231c5c; font-family: Times;"> </span><span style="color: black; font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><a href="http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autismMMR.pdf"><span style="color: #0000cc;">http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autismMMR.pdf</span></a>.</span><span style="color: #231c5c; font-family: Verdana;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Chief Medical Correspondent to CNN, plays it safe and neutral—though he’s a professional expected to evaluate a health issue—as he cites others who <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">downplay autism vaccine connection</b> in a story posted in 2008 on his blog: </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">“</span><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Within 48 hours</span></b><span style="font-family: Georgia;"> <u>after receiving her</u> <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;"><u>vaccinations</u>,</b> Hannah, then 19 months old and by all accounts a normal little girl, developed a high fever, inconsolable crying and some signs of regression, including difficulty walking and speaking... Gupta is quick to add: “The Centers for Diseases Control, American Academy of Pediatrics, Institute of Medicine and other <u>prestigious</u> medical organizations maintain there is no link between vaccines and autism.”</span> </div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><a href="http://www.cnn.com/HEALTH/blogs/paging.dr.gupta/2008/03/vaccines-and-autism.html"><span style="color: #0000cc;">http://www.cnn.com/HEALTH/blogs/paging.dr.gupta/2008/03/vaccines-and-autism.html</span></a></span><span style="font-family: Verdana;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Back to animals: “An in-depth study found adequate titers against canine distemper virus in 83% of a very large group of dogs vaccinated more than 4 years beforehand.” That means the dogs <u>didn’t</u> <u>need</u> <u>more shots</u>. “It’s crucial to monitor serum antibody levels for assessing immune memory response.”</span><span style="color: black; font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">&nbsp; </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><cite><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><a href="http://www.canine-epilepsy-guardian-angels.com/titer_test.htm"><span style="color: blue;">www.canine-epilepsy-guardian-angels.com/<b>titer</b>_<b>test</b>.htm</span></a></span></cite></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">If titer tests are indicated for puppies and dogs, why aren’t titer tests indicated for human children and adults? Why give or receive more vaccines if a body already has enough from prior vaccines? This would lead to over-vaccination and probably quadruple risk of adverse reactions. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Concerning acute, delayed or chronic adverse vaccine relayed reactions, how would a non-verbal baby, non-verbal elderly person, or non-verbal autistic individual <u>communicate they’re having an adverse or delayed reaction</u>?&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">They can’t.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">SO, they suffer in silence, unless someone is vigilantly watching. The “someone” watching is often told “don’t worry, vaccines are safe.” After a vaccine, they don’t even think about it. How many caregivers, doctors or nurses working in rest homes, group homes, schools and state-institutions for developmentally disabled or home health settings are told to monitor for adverse reactions after vaccinations? </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Protecting anybody from over-vaccination is critical, especially more vulnerable populations.</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">During major self-abusive meltdowns that have landed my severely-autistic son in hospital for treatment and evaluation, I’ve had, on occasion, nurses immediately start pushing vaccines.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Though I explain how dangerous it is for my severely-autistic son to have ANY foreign substances added to his already vulnerable mind and body, some still push vaccines.&nbsp;</span><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">I appreciate doctors and nurses who respect me, as a parent, having the right to protect my son. And who actually read a wide variety of research and don’t blindly accept abstract information or convoluted media sketches available to them.&nbsp;</span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Look, vaccines aren't bad, but for some children and adults they can do much harm. That is the reality that must be considered.&nbsp;</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span class="flc"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Take a look at this muddled media presentation&nbsp;on autism and vaccinations:</span></span><span style="font-family: Verdana;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: black; font-family: Verdana;">A new study published in the <u>January 2008</u> issue of Archives of </span><u><span lang="EN" style="color: blue; font-family: Verdana;">General Psychiatry</span></u><span lang="EN" style="color: black; font-family: Verdana;"> found the prevalence of autism cases in California children <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;"><u>continued to rise </u></b>after most vaccine manufacturers started to remove the mercury-based preservative thimerosal in 1999, suggesting that the chemical was not a primary cause of the disorder. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: black; font-family: Arial; font-size: 9pt;">Source: <a href="http://edition.cnn.com/2008/HEALTH/dailydose/12/04/autism.mercury/"><span style="color: blue;">http://edition.cnn.com/2008/HEALTH/dailydose/12/04/autism.mercury/</span></a></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">An article in the March 10, <u>2006</u> issue of the <b><i><a href="http://www.jpands.org/jpands1101.htm" target="_blank"><span style="color: blue;">Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons</span></a></i></b> shows that since mercury was removed from childhood vaccines the alarming increase in reported rates of autism and other neurological disorders in children not only stopped, but <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;"><u>actually dropped</u></b> sharply - by as much as 35%.</span><span lang="EN" style="color: black; font-family: Verdana;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Health-damaging re-actions from vaccines can no doubt be insidious. Research reminds us reactions may appear up to 30 days AFTER being vaccinated. Clearly, in certain populations, a titer lab test could prevent adverse reactions. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">According to Medline Plus, Trusted Health Information for You:</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">“Antibody TITER is a laboratory test that measures the presence and amount of antibodies in blood. The antibody level in the blood is a reflection of past exposure to an antigen or to something that the body does not recognize as belonging to itself.”</span> <span style="font-family: Verdana;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;">“<span style="font-family: Verdana;">In some situations, your health care provider may check your antibody TITER to see if you had an infection in the past (for example, chickenpox) or to decide which immunizations you need.”</span>&nbsp; </div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003333.htm"><span style="color: #0000cc;">http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003333.htm</span></a></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Verdana;">Ask your doctor if you’re autistic child or anyone else you are concerned about, is medically exempt. </span><b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Epilepsy, severe allergies, and siblings' previous adverse reactions</span></b><span style="font-family: Verdana;"> are a few conditions in child or family history which may increase the chances of an adverse reaction, and thus qualify for a <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">medical exemption</b>”</span> </div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;">Source: <span style="color: black; font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><a href="http://www.medical-library.net/content/0/9/10/1240/"><span style="color: #0000cc;">http://www.medical-library.net/content//0/9/10/1240/</span></a>.</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span><cite><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"></span></cite></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 9pt;">Additional sources: </span></div><ol style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 9pt;">&nbsp;<span style="display: none;"><br /></span><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;">www.whole-<b>dog</b>-journal.com/.../Annual-Pet-<b>Vaccinations</b>_20036-1.html</span></cite><span class="flc"> – </span></span></li><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 9pt;">Many veterinarians believe the practice of annual <b>vaccinations</b> is an <b>unnecessary</b> <span style="display: none;"><br /></span>evil, responsible for such diseases as allergy, seizures, anemia, even cancer. <cite><span style="color: #0e774a;">www.healthyhappy<b>dogs</b>.com/<b>Vaccinations</b></span></cite><span class="flc"> - </span></span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-1400906194462970595?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-50905527750233384472012-02-29T23:37:00.005-08:002012-03-12T09:14:16.155-07:00Things Largely Ignored: A Story by Parent of Severely-Autistic Son<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-size: 14pt;">A Creative Expression written by Kim Oakley, Mother of Severely-Autistic Son.&nbsp; Let me encourage parents of autistic children and adults to WRITE. Just WRITE. It's cheap therapy. </span><br /><br />&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Title: Things Largely Ignored</div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-size: 12.0pt;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;">Southeast Asia, 1969, air is wet, salty and peppered with blood. As Sky Raiders blast incoming Vietcong, it floats to the edge of his mind—and hovers like the Jolly Green he’s loaded into. Eyes guarded with gauze, he sees it now. The Spanish Colonial his father built after WWII. House is heavy, romantic, with golden yellows, rich reds, wicker chairs and shaker tables. Outside, vines bearing pendant bunches of fruit and a courtyard where he once played with his cousins. Cousins gone now: One taken by opium, one shot along the Mekong Delta, another crushed by an H-46 Sea Knight. <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Thump. Whoosh.</i> “Going home man,” says a voice behind him. He begins to fade. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;">Dirt la</span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">byrinths had been his home for two years. Tunnel Rats, they called them. Soldiers with iron nerves and sharp senses, summoned to flush out VC below the dank, dark soil of South Vietnam. Armed with only a flashlight and knife, he had served months on bended knees, sabotaging supply routes and slitting throats…until a booby trap blew him back to the jungle. </span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;">Even with the bang, and smell of flesh, he had no desire to return. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;">There is a fire in his chest, needle in arm and bags of blood. Then a rush of feet—a makeshift hospital, morphine, bamboo walls; chatter that becomes a fog of obscenities, a room with mosquito netting, pain and more painkillers. Breathing turns audible. “Going home mate?” asks a soldier with a British accent. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;">Upon arrival, there is no public welcome. His father waves, his mother clicks a camera. “You’re home,” cries the mother, rubbing his hand. As a Catholic afterthought: “Thanks be to God!” His mother, who was never thin, has now a slender look about her, and her eyes, always young, have half moons stamped under them. It’s been three years since they’ve ridden together in the Pontiac. Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head, by B.J. Thomas, plays on the radio. St. Jude, taped to the glove box, forever rides shotgun. </span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">Above and beyond foreign subterranean. A world not quite real, but real enough that tunnels turn into highways that turn into wide lanes that become narrow and wind among hills, sloped pastures and tilled fields in geometric patterns, until the car coasts through towering redwoods and pulls into a pebbled driveway. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">He’s wrecked all night. In his dreams, he moves under fields and villages, crawling over bodies, evading traps, pressing towards more space. He has become an animal of unknown origin. A screech owl awakens him. In the deep of evening, everything takes on a suspicious hue. He arises, stumbles into bathroom. For no reason apparent to anyone that would be watching, “Toilet paper! Canteen!” he shouts and startles a family of deer mice.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">Dusk comes and when it hits something like lighting stirs and explodes in his head and settles in his skin. He does not move from the cold floor or extinguish the cigarette burning on his chest. On a dresser, facing the bathroom, a clock his grandfather took during the taking of Berlin ticks softly. Eyelids flutter and close. He dreams of Cobras, Kraits, Punje Sticks and Bamboo vipers. “Wake up, darling,” whispers his mother. “I’ve made breakfast.” </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">As he eats, blackberry jam and scrambled eggs fuse and become brains. “You look pale,” says the mother. From behind a newspaper, “See a doctor,” suggests the father. The doctor, a former Navy Corpsman, administered </span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%;">Atabrine to </span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">1<sup>st</sup> Marine Regiment soldiers fighting in the bloody, mosquito-infested sands of Guadalcanal. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">Doc prescribes Dexedrine and Librium, assuring antagonistic agents will suppress antagonizing thoughts. They do not. The man’s brain craves adrenaline: Motorcycles; Hookers; Jack Daniels; A bit of blow— Colombia’s best—found in Strip Clubs, here and there. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">“Take up a hobby,” advises the doctor. The man buys a pool stick. At a local pool hall, he argues with a con artist and cracks the stick over the charlatan’s skull. “We don’t need no bad asses here,” says the bartender. Ten Tequila shots later, he swaps spit with a flower child he knew in high school, swipes her pack of Kool Menthols, and disappears into the night. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">Winter tumbles into spring. The man meets a woman. “A stone fox,” his bar friends call her. They get married and it’s a big deal, because it’s a big year for wine, so the man’s family throws a big wedding and when the priest gets sauced and falls into the salad, this is largely ignored because the veal is baked in a creamy oregano sauce and the family sells Syrah to the town’s wealthiest men who rely on things largely ignored. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">The man and wife move five miles from town, into a small home with a gabled roof and covered porch. The wife takes up painting. To everyone’s delight she is strikingly gifted. One evening, after a supper of Fondue and Salad, she paints a seaside jungle with colorful tangled roots of mangrove trees, solider crabs, dog headed snakes and mudskippers. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>“C’mon try it,” the wife pleads, placing a paintbrush in the man’s hand. He kisses her forehead. Sets the brush down. Takes a gulp of Tang with Vodka, and turns on the TV. Blue eyes fixed on the black and white TV all night. As morning shadows get shorter, sunlight sends the man into a blind rage. With one punch, he shatters the window. Ambles into the kitchen, smashes the toaster. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">When briefed of behavior, “He’s acting like a hoodlum,” remarks the father, and bites his lightly buttered toast. “Get him back working the vineyard.” </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">The man’s family had crafted wine for centuries. Like the Vietcong, the man has a strong attachment to his ancestral soil. Unlike the Vietcong, he lacks focus and self-discipline. Bill collectors and bankruptcy drive him deeper into despair, and he begins to shift. During a half-moon, a Sheriff coaxes him from a drainpipe near Tony’s Hardware store. He surfaces, ears pricked, scanning for trip wires. “C’mon son,” says the Deputy. “Let’s get you home.” The wife is not grateful when her husband returns. That night, she paints a sunken ship with parrot fish nibbling the red, blue and yellow coral growing on the wreck. Butterfly and angel fish swarm divers looking for treasure. The wife wants to help her man, but this is a time when problem behavior is largely ignored, so she continues to paint. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">When the man discovers his father has cancer, he threatens a renowned doctor at a renowned hospital. A Korean security guard— who smells like American after shave— escorts him out. The man squints and starts to say something. Remembers Koreans were bad asses—fought with US troops and without remorse against the Vietcong. Didn’t believe you could re-educate communists. Korean soldiers delivered lethal kicks, like the one he once saw that practically booted Charlie’s head off. “You go now,” says the guard. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">When his father expires, a long rope of anger entangles him, as if emotional ambush has waited for an opportune time to strike. Near unrecognizable at his father’s funeral, the man’s standard cut has grown into greasy brown curls that hang to his shoulders. Mustache and beard cover his once lean, clean freckled face. During the eulogy, he empties a bottle of Wild Turkey in one smooth swig, stands, and with expert marksmanship, hurls the bottle <i>at the Virgin Mary.</i></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">In the shadow of his mother’s grief, the man hitches a ride to San Francisco, where he meets a hooker named Karla- though she doesn’t charge him. She buys him Sativa cigarettes laced with coke. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>On cold nights, Karla and the man make hot, mad love, the kind you make when you’ve been tormented too long without relief. Love blooms. The man is high on hope.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span>Near dawn, Karla disappears in the back of a paddy wagon. For days, he hunts for her, without malice, searching alleys, corners and cars. All he finds are crumpled parking tickets, feral cats and a vodka drinking Vet who was shot climbing the Khe Sanh plateau.</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">When trees begin to drop leaves, the man drops into a bus and heads home. Head pressed into sticky vinyl, window quarter open, his temporal lobe twitches. He smells pollen and barbeque smoke. Somewhere over a stretch of road, he licks a pink dot. “A happy pill,” said a pink cheeked lady. He’s not happy. His mind begins to dance in unfamiliar moves. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoBodyText2" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: windowtext; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">Between bus transfers, the man trudges into a restroom. The floor is covered with brown-stained shirts. “As if toilet paper hadn’t been invented,” says a man holding a syringe. Above the sink, “Peace NOW!” carved into wall. He stares into a cracked mirror, flicks cigarette ashes into his mouth, rolling the taste along the inside of his cheeks, spits the ashy mud into his palms and smears it on his face. A sucking hiss of door and a pat on the shoulder awakens him. He walks. </span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;"></span></div><div class="MsoBodyText2" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: red;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span><span style="color: windowtext; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;"></span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">Along oleander lined roads, a car loaded with Christian Youth spot his faithless face and twitching thumb. His mother finds him hunched in the fetal position on the Welcome Mat, fresh faced, fermenting in urine.<span style="color: red;"> </span>“God in heaven,” she whispers. With trembling hands, the man sits up, lights a half-smoked joint. <span style="color: red;"></span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">The mother’s new boyfriend is an old gardener his father fired years ago for swiping hoses, hammers and rakes. Things a man with little shame and much want would steal. “He’s a changed man now,” claims the mother.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span>“He has his own business.” A small store that sells stolen things people sell him. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">The boyfriend roams the home, acquainting himself with family heirlooms, as if he’s part of the history. When the mother isn’t watching, he sees the man watch him. He looks at the man with hate and fear, the same look the man saw in Nam, and will never forget. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">In late autumn, the mother’s skin grows grey. Her lips turn blue. “Take these my darling,” says the boyfriend and hands her water and pills. As a daily ritual, the mother prays Psalm 64. As a weekly ritual, the boyfriend proposes and makes promises he can’t keep. On an early afternoon, when the boyfriend is at work, the man finds oval pills in a plastic bottle—pills that don’t match the mother’s prescription. He slams the bottle on a fiddle-back chair. Upstairs, he finds the mother in a deep sleep with a shallow pulse. He lays a cool towel on her head, elevates her legs. When she awakens, his heart aches with shame, fury and guilt and he knows what must be done. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">The boyfriend does not return home that evening. Nor any other evening, and soon his store is up for sale and there’s a new owner—a French man-- who stocks cedar shelves with Belgium chocolates and Italian Sodas. The boyfriend’s disappearance is largely ignored. Rumor is he has split with a wealthier widow, in a town nobody can name. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span>*****</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">Year after year, news of war arrives as bits of reality mixed with unreality. Every year, he wants to pick up the phone and call his wife, but picks up another drink instead. Inside the bar the man religiously sits, hunched over whiskey and watching TV. Above him hangs a prayer: “<i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Dios me concede la serenidad para aceptar las cosas que no puedo cambiar, valor para alterar estas cosas, y sabiduria para discernir la diferencia</i>.” </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">Winter after winter, the man hears his drinking comrades engage in spontaneous conversation inspired by rhythmic uprising in the news. <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Impending Economic Crash. Shortage of Gas. Worldwide Inflation. Peace talks in another nation. Politicians promise improvement. The Jesus Movement. Elvis Gets Divorce. End of Special Weapon Center Air Force. POWs Return. Agent Orange Burn. George Foreman vs. Muhammad Ali. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>So Long Howdy Doody. Unemployment reaches 8.9%. Nixon Resigns. </i>Night after night, Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On”, a frequent play on the jukebox. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma;">Across the world, the war has taken a new twist. As Operation Frequent Wind blows hard and fast, the man rocks slowly in a wicker chair, slowly rising, as if tired of rising, and turns</span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Arial Unicode MS';"> on new Heathkit TV. War has come back, no doubt, so he can crawl though this dark again. Stored memories activate. Pupils dilate. Breath backfires in his throat. <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Thump. Whoosh. </i>Evacuation choppers. Hands wave frantically in the air. Fall of Saigon imminent. Americans flee in droves. US Helicopters depart. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Arial Unicode MS';">A surge of tears flood his vacant, dry eyes. In a state of euphoria, “Ma!” he yells. The mother races into the room, stares at the TV with belated shock and joy. “Thanks be to God,” she says and crosses herself. There is nothing more to see. He makes frantic phone calls to the estranged wife. For the first time, his hands don’t twitch. The mother calls a priest. He calls out a prayer. Minutes later, “Thank you Father,” says the mother and she hangs up the phone. </span><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Creative Expression/Honing Theory:</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;"></span></div><br /><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 150%; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 11pt; line-height: 150%; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Arial Unicode MS';">©2012 Kim Oakley. All rights reserved </span></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-5090552775023338447?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-30455708504123980802012-02-26T20:58:00.007-08:002012-03-08T01:25:30.658-08:00DSM-5 Criteria for Autism: A Hot Mess<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span class="apple-style-span"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 9pt;">Self-harm is very common in people with Autism Spectrum Disorders...</span></span><span class="MsoHyperlink"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 9pt;"><u><span style="color: blue;"> </span></u></span></span><span class="apple-style-span"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 9pt;">between 20-30% of people with autism will self-harm in some way, but this is often seen as something different to when we hear about&nbsp;[a NON-AUTISTIC person]&nbsp;cutting or burning as a coping mechanism. </span></span><span class="apple-style-span"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 11pt;">The medical profession seems to make the same distinction, and usually refers to it as “self-injurious behaviour“ or SIB.&nbsp;</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span class="apple-style-span"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 11pt;"></span></span><span class="apple-style-span"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 11pt;">Source: <span style="color: #0e774a;"><a href="http://www.selfharm.co.uk/get/facts/autism_and_self-harm/">www.<b>selfharm</b>.co.<b>uk</b>/get/facts/<b>autism</b>_and_<b>self</b>-<b>harm</b>/</a></span></span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span class="apple-style-span"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 11pt;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;"><span style="font-size: small;">"Self-injury is most often associated with severely-disabled autistic people, but some people with HFA/AS also self-injure.This is a complex phenomenon which may occur for very different reasons in different people. People with autism may have reasons for self-injury (such as sensory problems or a need to establish body boundaries) <span style="font-size: large;">which are not shared by non-autistic</span>&nbsp; people who self-injure" Source: </span><a href="http://www.users.dircon.co.uk/~cns/cousins.html"><span style="font-size: small;">http://www.users.dircon.co.uk/~cns/cousins.html</span></a></span></span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span class="apple-style-span"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 11pt;">Self-injurious behavior is a hallmark behavior of those on autism spectrum.&nbsp;SIB is&nbsp;not NON-SUICIDAL INJURY as the DSM-5 task forces seem to think it is, as if it’s a separate diagnosis from autism. This shows extreme ignorance on part of those working on DSM-5 Autistic Disorder criteria. </span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span lang="EN" style="mso-ansi-language: EN;">A 2007 study reported that self-injury at some point affected about 30% of children with ASD. Source: <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16581226">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16581226</a></span></div><br /><br /><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Why I’m Semi-OK, well, just Disgusted over Revisions to DSM-5 Autism Spectrum Disorder. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 47.25pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list 47.25pt; text-indent: -29.25pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Verdana; mso-fareast-font-family: Verdana;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">1.<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Because it illuminates a pervasive intellectual failure of autism experts to understand hallmark traits of autism, such as episodic or repetitive self-injurious behaviors. Contrary to what <u>a few</u> research studies say, <u>hundreds </u>of research studies show self-injurious behavior is a hallmark feature of individuals on autism spectrum. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 47.25pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list 47.25pt; text-indent: -29.25pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Verdana; mso-fareast-font-family: Verdana;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">2.<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Because it illuminates a pervasive professional failure of autism intelligence gathering. Researchers hungry for more power, prestige and personal gain are tired of researching severely-autistic individuals. Why? As one researcher said: they are “so much time, money and human effort.” <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>And their parents come back for “repeated evaluations.” Let me translate: “severely-autistic children are too much work.” “We don’t want anymore information about them.”</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 47.25pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list 47.25pt; text-indent: -29.25pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Verdana; mso-fareast-font-family: Verdana;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">3.<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Because while I see people like Catherine Lord and other autism “experts” justifiably TRYING to narrow the definition of autism to identify actual autism, they are still SEDUCED and confused by media obsessed with autistic savants (who make up 1% of spectrum), venture capitalists and absurd role models of autism who do NOT represent or want severely-autistics (especially severe autism and self-abuse&nbsp;in minority children)&nbsp;included in research or shown in media. Specifically, I’m talking about some in neurodiversity movements. SOME of these people hate severely-autistic children and frequently seek out and vilify their parents. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Alas, I’m not worried the DSM-5 will hurt my severely-autistic son. He’s been evaluated more times than the Middle East. He’s had more tests than a Hypochondriac Billionaire. He meets the criteria for severe autism (level 3) diagnosis in the DSM-5 proposed revision. But, I fear the DSM-5 will hurt many families with severely-autistics in the future, if the definition doesn’t <u>further ELABORATE on what severe autism level 3 involves</u>. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">I suppose I get upset with people like Catherine Lord and other autism experts because they remind me of my experiences with professionals who have remained, for decades, so disconnected from the realities of living with severe autism. And say hurtful things like “so much time, so much human effort” about handling severely-autistic children. The casual indifference and ignorance is too much to bear. It infuriates me. And pierces my heart. I don’t like to cry. I’m afraid I’ll never stop. I’d rather be angry. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">It would be great to crash the autism expert’s seminars, symposiums, workshops and conferences, and bring in my son during a self-abusive meltdown. Let’s see what these experts are really made of. It would be a fabulous Hidden Camera Moment. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Allow me to analyze myself. I am no doubt traumatized, and driven to hyper-vigilance, by years of having to advocate like an animal in the face of pervasive apathy, disregard and neglect towards my son’s autism and severe self-injurious behaviors. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">As a result, the nanosecond I detect apathy and disregard, I want to expose and confront the people involved. To me, there is no greater degree of human evil than that of those in high places who <u>pretend they care about elderly, poor and disabled</u>, but show repeated signs and symptoms they are NOT HELPING individuals or families. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">In summary, I agree with the ATTEMPTS of DSM-5 to narrowing definition of autism. I don’t think a child with Rett’s, Landau Kleffner or other genetically linked factors, such as Fragile-X, should be considered ACTUAL AUTISM, though no doubt, they too need help. At the same time, I’m disgusted experts STILL don’t understand how to ANALYZE autism. It’s not rocket science. You simply ASK the parents, have you ruled out other factors? This is SELDOM, if ever asked. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">As I’ve repeatedly suggested, our son’s case is a great case for autism research. We’ve already put in the “time, money and human effort” for the researchers! We’ve already had a plethora of known disorders commonly misdiagnosed as autism RULED OUT. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">He’s actual autism. Maybe that’s why media-pleasing researchers don’t want to know us. They may have to then acknowledge that <u>autistics with severe behaviors and intellectual challenges do exist</u>. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">That may upset Neurodiversity zealots. Apparently, some, not all, in the neurodiversity movement are obsessed with redefining autism. They pretend they care about severely-autistic children, but like the caste system, they want these “others” out. They want moms like me to “stop showing videos of severe autism on YouTube.” </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Not until I see the zealots of Neurodiversity stand up for severe autism and cease attacking parents of severely autistic children, will I believe their melodious mission statements and pious petitions. Not until I see autism experts present with signs and symptoms of autism expertise will I believe their titillating titles. Meanwhile, I don’t put my hopes in autism experts. I put my hope in God and my own expertise in handling my own son. I rely on the doctors involved in my son’s case. Doctors I can trust and who have proven they care. </span></div><br />Kim Oakley</div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-3045570850412398080?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-30387068120561693782012-02-25T03:21:00.001-08:002012-04-15T23:29:13.547-07:00Neuropsychiatry for Autism?<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a><br /><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">“Epilepsy is more common in individuals with autism than in the general population,” says a 2009 <b>Institute of Clinical Sciences and Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology report...“</b>study of young adults with autism showed high rates of epilepsy… A diagnosis of AUTISM in children with intractable epilepsy remained after surgical intervention.”</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">“One must be aware that AD, Asperger syndrome and autistic-like conditions are <u>behaviorally</u> defined diagnoses, in contrast to…eg infantile spasms, Landau Kleffner syndrome or the syndrome of continuous spike-and-wave during sleep. These diagnoses are based on specific EEG findings together with clinical symptoms and signs and affect both previously healthy children and children with neurodevelopmental disorders. Acquired functional deficits, including cognitive and/or <u>language regression, seen in these children are potentially reversible [cured] and treatable as they are presumed to be caused by epileptiform activity.” </u></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><span style="text-decoration: none;"></span></span></u></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">“In a retrospective follow-up study on a clinical series of</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">130 individuals 18-35 years old diagnosed with autism in childhood and without a known associated medical condition epilepsy was found in 25% (Hara 2007).” </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Parents of autistic children and adults spend many years and hundreds of hours floating between primary care physicians, gastroenterologists, geneticists, psychiatrists and neurologists. I’m finally down to three. It would be great to narrow the medical maze to TWO doctors. This may sound like it’s no big deal, but it&nbsp;is when you spend half your life traveling for an hour in a car, sitting for another hour in an office and waiting 45 minutes in an exam room with a severely- autistic son. By the end, I often feel like making myself an appointment with several psychiatrists. Or at least picking up some dark chocolate and a bottle of Pinot Noir on the way home. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Times;">“</span><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Study by Olsson et al. (1988), three quarters of all children with autism and epilepsy had <u>partial seizures</u> only or in combination with <u>other seizure types</u>, as did three quarters of adults</span><span style="font-family: Verdana;"> </span><span style="font-family: Verdana;">with active epilepsy” </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Finally, the report noted it hopes information provided will “increase awareness of individuals with both <u>epilepsy and autism</u>, so that optimal support and interventions can be provided and planned for through the collaboration between psychiatry and neurology”. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">So, we must ask: Why are autistics with epilepsy and behavioral issues constantly bounced back and forth between psychiatry and neurology? Interestingly, there is growing support for&nbsp;the </span><span lang="EN" style="font-family: Verdana;">rapprochement of neurology and psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry&nbsp;becoming&nbsp;a specific branch of medicine that could better medically manage moderate to severely autistic patients. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><span lang="EN" style="font-family: Verdana;"></span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Reference: </span><span style="color: black; font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><a href="http://gupea.ub.gu.se/bitstream/2077/18971/4/gupea_2077_18971_4.pdf"><span style="color: #0000cc;">http://gupea.ub.gu.se/bitstream/2077/18971/4/gupea_2077_18971_4.pdf</span></a>.</span></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-3038706812056169378?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-20598480576842168152012-02-23T16:01:00.005-08:002012-03-08T00:18:36.029-08:00Self-Injurious Behavior in Autism Spectrum Disorder<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><a href="about:blank" name="navskip"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Self-Injurious Behavior (SIB) among High-Functioning Autistic Individuals or Persons with Aspergers has received little attention, despite SIB having potential to identify underlying issues connecting individuals on the autism spectrum. </span></a></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Self-injurious behavior is a hallmark feature of autism. Yet, unless it’s severe it’s often undiagnosed. Much like autism spectrum, there is a self-injurious behavior spectrum: Mild to Severe. </span></u></span><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;"></span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">We find parents reporting self-injury among children with Aspergers: </span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><ol style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Jan 23, 2011 <b>...</b> Moms and dads have a natural tendency to run to their <b>Aspergers</b> <b>...</b> in a tantrum <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span>that cause them <b>self</b>-<b>harm</b> (e.g., banging <b>head, hitting</b> self, etc.) </span></span><a href="http://www.myaspergerschild.com/.../aspergers-temper-tantrums-15-tips-for.html"><span style="color: blue;"><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">www.my<b>aspergers</b>child.com/.../<b>aspergers</b>-temper-tantrums-15-tips-for.html</span></span><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"></span></span></a><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><span class="flc"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"> </span></span></span></li><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Dec 20, 2010 <b>...</b> Children and teens with <b>Aspergers</b> may engage in self-harming <b>behaviors</b> (also <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span>called <b>...</b> What can be done to prevent <b>self</b>-<b>injurious behavior</b>? </span></span><a href="http://www.myaspergerschild.com/2010/12/aspergers-and-self-injury.html"><span style="color: blue;"><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">www.my<b>aspergers</b>child.com/2010/12/<b>aspergers</b>-and-<b>self</b>-injury.html</span></span><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"></span></span></a><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><span class="flc"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"> </span></span></span></li><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Nov 10, 2011 <b>...</b> Individuals who engaged in <b>self</b>-<b>injurious</b> behaviors as children may return to <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span>these as <b>adults</b> during times of stress, illness or change. </span></span><a href="http://www.autism.org.uk/living-with.../self-injurious-behaviour.aspx"><span style="color: blue;"><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">www.autism.org.uk/living-with.../<b>self</b>-<b>injurious</b>-behaviour.aspx</span></span><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"></span></span></a><span style="color: #0e774a;"><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><cite><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></cite></span><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"></span></span></span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><span class="flc"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">We find Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry website reporting self-injury among autism: </span></span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><ol style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="color: #534741; margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt; mso-list: l1 level1 lfo2; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><span class="flc"><span style="color: windowtext; font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">“</span></span></span><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Children diagnosed with autism </span></u></span><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">tend to process and respond to information in the environment in unique ways. In some cases, parents are frightened because they <u>exhibit</u> aggressive and<u>/or self-injurious behaviors</u> which are difficult to manage…”</span></span><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"> </span></span><a href="http://www.aacap.org/cs/autism_resource_center/faqs_on_autism"><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">http://www.aacap.org/cs/autism_resource_center/faqs_on_autism</span></span><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"></span></a><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"></span></span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><h1 style="background: white; margin: auto 0in;"><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">We find Autism Society reporting: “</span></span><span style="mso-bookmark: navskip;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; font-weight: normal; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold;">Early Indicators: <u>High Functioning Autism and Aspergers Syndrome</u></span></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; font-weight: normal; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold;">… The disorder makes it hard to communicate and relate to the social world. In some cases, aggressive <u>and/or SELF-INJURIOUS BEHAVIOR</u> may be present (Autism Society of Delaware, 2005); </span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Source: </span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;"><a href="http://www.disabled-world.com/artman/publish/article_2255.shtml"><span style="color: #0000cc;">http://www.disabled-world.com/artman/publish/article_2255.shtml</span></a>.</span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;"> </span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;"></span></h1><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Because Aspergers individuals don’t possess a clinically significant cognitive delay and are of average or <u>above average intellect</u>, self-injurious behaviors <u>often go unnoticed</u>. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Self-injurious behaviors (ie… scratching arms, pulling hair, slapping or punching face) may occur <u>in isolation</u>. Or occur covertly, often triggered by high stress, bullying, sudden changes or being trapped in highly-illogical situations triggering extreme frustration. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">For example, an Asperger’s man sitting in a meeting listening to something he can’t process, or finds inanely <u>nonsensical</u>, may hide arms under table and pinch himself. Or, later go into bathroom and yank hair. You’d never know it. Or a high-functioning autistic woman who is hyper-focusing on reading and constantly interrupted may, when the person interrupting leaves, slam fists into face. Thus, behavior may go unnoticed. In contrast, a severely-autistic individual—with more severe sensory and processing issues, let’s loose in any situation, by no fault of their own. Thus, it’s noticed. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">SIB seen in higher functioning autistics differs in intensity, frequency and duration. For example, a severely-autistic child may hit head daily for several minutes. In contrast, an Asperger child may slap head five times once a week. In both cases, it’s self-injurious behavior. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Though there are differences between HF autism and LF (low functioning) autism, there seems a major <u>connection with tendency to engage in self-injury</u>. Hence, self-injurious behavior is a core feature of actual autism. </span></div><h1 style="background: white; margin: auto 0in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; font-weight: normal; mso-bidi-font-weight: bold;">Here it is again mentioned: “Many symptoms that occur on the autism spectrum…severe anxiety and difficulty in communication…result in significant reduction of quality of life. More URGENTLY, certain symptoms such as <u>self-injurious behavior</u> represent an immediate danger of self harm.” </span><span style="font-size: 11pt;"><a href="http://www.aspergerssyndrome.org/PDF/AutismSubtypes.pdf">http://www.aspergerssyndrome.org/PDF/AutismSubtypes.pdf</a></span><span style="font-size: 14pt;"></span></h1><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Clearly, self-injurious behavior exists across autism spectrum and as such, can no longer be ignored by researchers as being something else. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Of great interest is self-injurious behaviors among autistics DIFFER differ from other diagnostic groups. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Severely-autistic individuals tend to target <u>above neck</u> (head/face hitting, face slapping, face scratching and pulling hair). Higher functioning individuals also target head, as well as arms. Interesting, HEAD is major target, given autistic individuals often experience sensory overload and processing challenges rooted within brain, as if head hitting is natural reaction to incoming assaults and internal chaos. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Let’s compare self-injury seen in <u>GENETIC conditions</u> with self-injury seen in <u>actual autism</u>. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Self-Injury seen in Cornelia de Lange syndrome presents as <u>biting fingers</u> and <u>putting fingers in mouth</u>. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Individuals with Rett Syndrome present with: <u>hand wringing, hand mouthing</u> and digging fingernails into opposite hand. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Individuals with Prader-Willi Syndrome present with obsessive <u>skin-picking</u> causing tissue damage. </span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Individuals with Lesch-Nyan present with eye-poking, <u>tongue and cheek biting</u>, head banging, nose gouging.&nbsp;&nbsp;<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Individuals with Fragile-X/Angelman’s syndrome may display SIB, but these are not true autism. These too are genetic conditions identified by distinctive characteristics and chromosomal abnormalities, thus separating them from actual autism. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Some researchers think autism is genetic. But there’s no concrete evidence. Until there is, we should contain what we know to be factual and logical about self-injurious behaviors among autistics and not swirl different diagnostic groups into autism behavioral research. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">It would make sense to study together high and low functioning autistics who exhibit self-injurious behaviors to identify common underlying mechanisms fueling or triggering their SIB. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;">&nbsp;</div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">© Kim Oakley February 23, 2012 </span><span style="color: black;"></span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Georgia; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;"><span style="font-size: small;">selbst verletzungen bei autismus</span></span></div></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-2059848057684216815?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-32509505851829425292012-02-19T22:45:00.008-08:002012-04-15T23:28:42.000-07:00Autistics with Severe Behaviors Exist<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt;">Why is “Autism Expert” Catherine Lord Obsessed with&nbsp;Ignoring self-injurious behaviors in the Severely-Autistic Population? &nbsp;</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">We see why inside a 2010 Dissertation titled, </span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">“<u>Defining and Quantifying Severity of Impairment in Autism Spectrum Disorders Across the Lifespan,</u></span><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;"> <span lang="EN">written by Katherine Oberle Gotham, who lists Catherine Lord as her “advisor.” &nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">On page 6 of paper, Gotham writes, “One reason that <u>so much time</u>, <u>money </u>and <u>human effort</u> continues to be <u>expended</u> toward identifying the <u>cause of ASD</u> is that it is <u>very difficult</u> <u>to eradicate social and repetitive behavior symptoms</u> and virtually <u>impossible to CURE</u> these disorders.” </span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;"><br /></span></div><h2 style="margin: auto 0in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: small; font-weight: normal;">Somewhere along the autism research road Catherine Lord discovered that researching behavioral problems in autism required more than a short-term study. </span></h2><h2 style="margin: auto 0in;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-weight: normal;">Something had to be revised. </span><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-weight: normal;">So much time…so many time sensitive projects… So much money…severe subjects so costly……So much human effort<a href="about:blank" name="7472997192485708047"></a>…”impossible to cure”. </span></i></span></h2><h2 style="margin: auto 0in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: small; font-weight: normal;">Catherine Lord should know self-injurious behavior (SIB) isn’t an anomaly among severely-autistics. If she doesn’t know, then I submit she is not qualified to be an autism SPECTRUM expert. Yet, I DO think she knows SIB exists. Extensive RESEARCH shows SIB exists among Low to Moderate and High Functioning and even Asperger individuals. </span></h2><h2 style="margin: auto 0in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: small; font-weight: normal;">Special education teachers earn credentials in Mild/Moderate or Moderate/Severe areas. Shouldn’t autism spectrum disorder be divided in same manner? Does DSM-5 intend to ignore SIB in autism spectrum? </span></h2><h2 style="margin: auto 0in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: small; font-weight: normal;">Is Catherine Lord, an alleged autism “expert” working on DSM-5, willfully ignoring the reality of behaviors to ease the burden of autism research? Does she view autistics with serious behavioral issues as an expenditure of too much time, money and effort? </span><span class="post-authorvcard"><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana;"></span></span></h2><h2 style="margin: auto 0in;"><span class="post-authorvcard"><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana;">“</span></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; font-weight: normal;">Current <u>autism research tends to exclude</u>, <u>for matters of convenience of the researchers involved</u>, <u>use of severely-autistic study participants</u>…,” </span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12pt; font-weight: normal;">wrote </span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12pt; font-weight: normal;">Harold</span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12pt; font-weight: normal;"> L </span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12pt; font-weight: normal;">Doherty</span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12pt; font-weight: normal;">, father of a severely-autistic son and author of</span><span class="post-authorvcard"><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12pt; font-weight: normal;"> </span></span><span class="fn"><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12pt; font-weight: normal;">Autism Reality NB</span></span><span class="post-authorvcard"><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12pt; font-weight: normal;"> found here: </span></span><span class="post-authorvcard"><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12pt;"><a href="http://autisminnb.blogspot.com/">http://autisminnb.blogspot.com/</a></span></span><span class="post-authorvcard"><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12pt; font-weight: normal;"> December 30<sup>th</sup>, 2011.</span></span></h2><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">What would be <u>less burdensome</u> for Lord to study in autism subjects? </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">On page 107 of Gotham’s Lord inspired paper it us gives a hint, “…URGENT need to study TREATMENT for DEPRESSION in ASD.” WHY is researching depression in autism suddenly “URGENT?” But not repetitive behaviors like slamming your head into a wall, bolting into street or jumping off tables? </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 11pt;">Of interest: Gotham’s husband, </span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 11pt;">Stephen Brunswasser,</span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 11pt;"> involved in “<u>Launching a New Depression Center Program, Campus Mind Works” at the University of Michigan where Gotham and Lord worked together.<i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;"> </i>Source: <a href="http://www.depressioncenter.org/news/081210-campusmind.asp">http://www.depressioncenter.org/news/081210-campusmind.asp</a> </u></span><br /><u><span style="font-family: Verdana;"></span></u></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Of interest: Gotham says in paper: “This research supported by grants from….AUTISM SPEAKS [principal investigator Catherine Lord] and BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD of Michigan. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">On page 56, Gotham says, “TEAACH methods” showed “greater increase in social adaptive behavior.” “NO effects were found for hours of PARENT training in ABA.” (Blue Cross fights against COVERING ABA)</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">SEE: </span><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Blue Cross Blue Shield</span><span style="font-family: Verdana;"> Ends Coverage for Medically Necessary Treatment for <span style="display: none;"><br /></span>Autism. </span><span style="font-family: Verdana;">See, <a href="http://www.twincities.com/ci_19582260" target="_blank" title="&quot;Blue Cross change concerns patient advocates for autistic children,&quot;"><span style="color: blue;">“Blue Cross change concerns patient advocates for autistic children,”</span></a> by Christopher Snowbeck, published Dec. 20, 2011 in the Pioneer Press.</span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Analyzing Gotham’s paper, her understanding of autistic behavior appears limited to eye squinting, hand flapping, echolalia and collecting ticket stubs. Gotham fails to cite or mention self-injurious behavior in autism. She does, however, cite numerous of Catherine Lord’s vague studies. What is motive for ignoring challenging behaviors in autism? Hasn't Ms. Lord also invented an "instrument" in which focused on diagnosing autism in babies? Is this involved in her DSM-5 criteria? </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Read again Gotham’s writing because it’s illuminating: “One reason <u>so much time</u>, <u>money </u>and <u>human effort</u> continues to be expended toward identifying the cause of ASD is that it is very difficult to eradicate social and repetitive behavior symptoms and virtually impossible to CURE these disorders.” </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">What a bias attitude to bring into autism research. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">And Gotham’s Catherine Lord inspired work continues…</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">On page 14, “True normalization of severity of autism would require a representative population, but to date, population studies have been too SMALL…” </span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;">Now they want them to disappear.</span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">On page 15, “approach to developing a <u>severity metric</u>…on basis of <u>theoretically driven</u> expectations.” </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">On Page 26, “tendency for children of higher severity to have more clinical re-evaluations than those with less pronounced features of ASD.” …“calibrated severity is based on relatively BRIEF, OFFICE-based observation with a clinician...” &nbsp;</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">In Chapter 3 we find autistic children assigned “class membership. And minorities are more severe and get de-labeled. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">On page 54, “<u>MINORITY race status</u> increased the odds of being in worsening class by 113%.” Three children in this class “ultimately” <u>received a NON autistic diagnosis</u>.&nbsp; </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">On page 55, “Losses in language skills were most prevalent in IMPROVING class.”&nbsp; Gotham speculates these autistics are developing at faster rates.” </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">On page 58, “Majority of participants in Persistent High and Moderate Classes had FINAL diagnoses of autism.”&nbsp; <br />”Most children in Worsening and Improving Class had PDD-NOS diagnosis.” </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">On page 59, <span style="font-size: small;">“we expect caregivers to self-refer for REPEATED evaluations more OFTEN in the case of <u>persistently severe autism characteristics</u>.” Heaven Forbid<i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;"> parents or advocates working on behalf of severely-autistic want another evaluation. So much time...So much human effort. </i></span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">On page 72, “Continued research on depression in ASD is crucial.” (Especially when your husband is going to work in a Depression Center Program) </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">On page 73, “…individuals with mild autism [and higher verbal skills] seem to be more affected by depression. </span><span style="font-family: Verdana;">That’s the new area of concern now…</span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">depression. And look what Gotham writes next: </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">On page 76, “Assessment of <u>depression</u> criteria in general population relies on <u>communication skills</u> often ABSENT OR ABNORMAL in ASD.”&nbsp; </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">On page 78, “it’s ironic that by INCLUDING individuals with ASD in the COMMUNITY…we may be increasing their risk for <u>depressive</u> symptoms.” <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">I disagree. Autistics isolated from community, drugged, shackled and hidden are more likely depressed. </i></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;"><span style="font-size: small;">I’m sure&nbsp;DR. Lord (who is a Ph.D, not MD)&nbsp;has invested ample time and effort into autism research. She hasn’t invested her money to my knowledge, though, as for years, she’s been living off Other people's money (OPM) ie..&nbsp;government GRANTS, private foundations, companies, royalties, etc… which I suppose is norm for researchers&nbsp;building a highway to&nbsp;the corporate&nbsp;corners of autism research.</span> </span></i><span style="color: black; font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><a href="http://chargesyndrome.org/documents/MartinCV.pdf"><span style="color: #0000cc;">http://chargesyndrome.org/documents/MartinCV.pdf</span></a>.</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Catherine Lord and others like her&nbsp;who work&nbsp;in autism&nbsp;research,&nbsp;<span style="font-size: small;">likely start out with frenetic enthusiasm for helping autistic individuals. At some point,&nbsp;they meet burnout and lose interest.&nbsp;They became <u>addicted to living off grants</u>. A psychological shift occurs. A fundamental loss of interest settles in. They, like Gotham&nbsp;alludes, long&nbsp;for easier autism subjects. <i>So much time, so much human effort...</i></span></span><br /><br /><span style="color: black; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;"><span style="font-size: small;">Awhile back, Venture Capitalists scooped up Catherine Lord. A NEW autism treatment and research facility to fuel 100 more years of autism research that honors tradition of “further studies needed.” </span></span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Verdana;">I wish I could meet with new autism researchers and tell them not to start off so fast. Not to get too comfortable in a classroom. Or obtain too much knowledge from instructors. To apply for autism grants to effect change. Hold ground. Break new ground. Don’t depend on work of past scholars. Observe actual needs of autistic individuals. Don’t be afraid to tackle serious behavioral issues. Don't ever become compromised. </span><br /><br /><span style="color: black; font-family: Verdana;">Autistic individuals with difficult behaviors shouldn’t be ignored. They will not be ignored. There is hope. There are things we can do to improve their lives and the lives of those who live, work and care for them. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">For researchers reading this who feel offended, or now hate my guts, get over it. If none of this applies to you, then don't worry about it. Man up. Woman up or whatever you need to do to be on the up. I'm so sick of whiners in&nbsp;professional places&nbsp;who can't handle criticism. This isn't a tea party. You aren't in charge of bunch of plastic cups, plates and finger sandwhiches. You are getting millions of dollars to research a disorder that is causing a lot of pain and suffering in millions of people. And you're not doing a very good job managing the autism research funds. To this date,&nbsp;autism research remains&nbsp;a big black hole of ambiguity and staged studies, where priniciapl investigators seldom check the work being funded and then, at the last second, everyone runs around scrambling to put data together, so it appears as if someone actually gave a damn. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Sources: </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">1. About 10% to <br /><b>15</b>% of individuals with ASD engage in some form of <b>self</b>-<b>injurious behavior</b> (SIB) <b>...</b></span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">3.. <cite><span style="color: #0e774a;">&nbsp;</span></cite></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 11pt;">Gotham dedicates 2010 PhD Dissertation to family: <u>Stephen Brunswasser</u> and Mary Gotham. Also thanks Andrew Pickles and <u>Somer Bishop</u>, Albert Cain, Israel Liberzon and Mohammad Ghaziuddin and her “advisor” <u>Catherine Lord</u> for which she has immense gratitude for Lord’s mentorship and collaboration. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><cite><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #0e774a;">deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/77759/1/kog_1.pdf</span></span></cite><span class="flc"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"> </span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span class="flc"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">4. &nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Conflict of interest for <b>Catherine Lord</b>: I receive royalties from a publisher for the <span style="display: none;"><br /></span>instrument on <b>......</b> <b>behaviors in autism</b> using the Autism Diagnostic Interview-R.</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><cite><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #0e774a;">deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/77983/1/142_ftp.pdf</span></span></cite><span class="flc"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"> </span></span><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><b><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 11pt;">5. Catherine Lord</span></b><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;"> </span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 11pt;">is to lead a New Comprehensive Autism Treatment Institute, in New York, scheduled to open in 2012. People involved in funding institute</span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">: “</span><b><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Laura Slatkin</span></b><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"> and Ilene Lainer are teaming up with <u>hedge fund giant</u> Jim <b>...</b> The <span style="display: none;"><br /></span>women recruited leading <b>autism</b> clinitian Dr. <b>Catherine Lord</b> <b>...”</b> <span style="color: #0e774a;"><cite>finance.fortune.cnn.com/2011/06/.../<b>autism</b>s-new-venture-capitalists</cite><cite><span style="color: windowtext;"></span></cite></span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span lang="EN" style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">6. 2009.</span><span lang="EN" style="font-family: Verdana;"> National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded more than 50 autism research grants, <u>totaling more than $65 million</u>, supported with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act) funds.</span><span lang="EN"> WHO received some of the money? <u>Catherine Lord</u>, Ph.D., of the University of Michigan, and <u>Somer Bishop,</u> Ph.D., of the Children's Hospital in Cincinnati. FOR WHAT? To “study” how to CHANGE the Autism Diagnostic Interview--into a <u>brief</u> parent interview that can be done <u>over the telephone</u>. Lord and Bishop said it could reduce <u>research screening costs and help quickly identify potential participants for ASD studies</u>. So much time…so much human effort. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span lang="EN">7. <a avglschecked="1840895365S0" href="http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/554574&amp;sa=U&amp;ei=A-tBT5H4FcmZ2QWzpcW2CA&amp;ved=0CBwQFjAD&amp;usg=AFQjCNEmEYdb3YzqDtF5vZwKqiC1D-bwbw">An Expert Interview With <b>Laura Schreibman</b>, PhD</a>&nbsp;</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span lang="EN">Nov 1, 2007 <b>...</b> <b>Laura Schreibman</b>, PhD, is Director of the <b>Autism</b> Program and Distinguished <b>...</b> <br /><b>behaviors</b> such as <b>self</b>-<b>injury</b> or <b>self</b>-stimulatory <b>behavior</b>.</span><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"></span></div><div class="s"><div><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;">www.medscape.com/viewarticle/554574</span></cite><span class="flc"> </span></div></div></div><div><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;"><a href="http://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/video-glossary/glossary-terms">www.<b>autism</b>speaks.org/what-<b>autism</b>/video-glossary/glossary-terms</a></span></cite><span class="flc"> </span></div><div></div><div></div><div><span class="flc">2. Nov 4, 2011 <b>...</b> <b>Dr</b>. <b>Rimland</b> was also one of the creators of the controversial DAN! <b>...</b> <b>behavior</b> <br />problems (obsessive-compulsive, <b>self</b>-<b>injury</b>, aggression, etc.).</span><br /><div><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;"><b>autism</b>.about.com/od/treatmentoptions/a/DANQandA.htm</span></cite><span class="flc"> -</span></div></div><div></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-3250950585182942529?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com1tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-11034816313482368582012-02-18T21:40:00.003-08:002012-02-25T10:05:27.281-08:00Autism Treatments That Help<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Things That Help My Severely-Autistic Son and May Help Others: </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Challenge</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">: Disruptive vocalizations. I’m not talking about baseline vocalizations. I’m referring to extremely loud, repetitive screaming. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">1<sup>st</sup> Line Treatment: </span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>L-Tyrosine 500 mg-1000mg. Given either @ 7 AM before breakfast or PRN in afternoon before lunch. Not given @ night. Often reduces incessant vocalizations. I thought L-Tyrosine could help after analyzing research on disruptive vocalizations in elderly patients in nursing homes (L-tyrosine is a natural way to elevate dopamine). </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">2<sup>nd</sup> <u>Line Treatment</u>: Green Tea Powder mixed in oatmeal or yogurt. Or strong lukewarm Green tea with a little sugar. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Challenge</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">: Self-Injurious Behaviors (SIB) (punching head, temples and chin extremely hard with fists)</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Current Maintenance Treatment</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">: Prescribed NICOTINE Transdermal Patch 7mg applied to dry skin @ 7am, removed at 5pm. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Challenge</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">: Constipation (one of many triggers to SIB)<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">1<sup>st</sup> line Treatment</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">: Minced, Pureed Diet. Power Purees (lots of organic berries, yogurt, flaxseed, apple juice, etc…) <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">2<sup>nd</sup> <u>line Treatment</u>: Suppository </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">3<sup>rd</sup> line</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;"> Treatment: Lactalose PO (by mouth) mixed with juice or Ensure with Fiber</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Challenge</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">: Preventing Colds, Flu, and other Illness Known to Increase his Self-injurious Behaviors</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Preventative Care#1</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">:<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span>2-3 Kyolic #105 Garlic Capsules with lunch.</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Preventative Care #2</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">: Warm bath 2 xs daily with Epsom Salt and aromatherapy (lavender and tea tree oil). If needed, turn on sink faucet until bathroom is saturated with steamy mist, to loosen mucus. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">1<sup>st</sup> line</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;"> treatment: Drops of Echinacea/Goldenseal tincture by mouth. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">2<sup>nd</sup> line</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;"> treatment: See Primary Care Doc to rule out sinus or ear infection.</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Challenge: </span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>Up All Night-Insomnia: Underlying medical issues ruled out</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">1<sup>st</sup> line</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;"> treatment: Massage Therapy </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">2<sup>nd</sup> line</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;"> treatment: Weighted Blankets to help with restless legs, sensory overload or general anxiety. Wrap up to neck only. Monitor closely. Move blankets down to shoulders when asleep. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">3<sup>rd</sup> line</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;"> treatment: Leave Headphones ON to block out noises, keep room EXTRA quiet, lights down, until falls asleep. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Challenge</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">: Avoiding Hospital-Acquired Infection/Illness </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">1<sup>st</sup> line</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;"> treatment: Second he arrives home, he’s in the bath. Hair washed. Body scrubbed. A little Tea Tree Oil Conditioner left in hair. Don’t want to carry home what’s floating around hospital settings. Teeth brushed with baking soda and hydrogen peroxide. Ears swabbed with Tea Tree Oil pads. Shoes cleaned with Lysol wipes. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Challenge</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">: Avoiding Day Program-Acquired Infection/Illness</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Preventative Care</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">: Take him straight from car to bathtub. Hair and body washed. Ears cleaned. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Challenge</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">: Increased Seizure Activity</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Preventative Care</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">: Frequently feed foods high in Omegas (sardines, flaxseed, and salmon). </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">1<sup>st</sup> line</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;"> treatment: Prescribed 0.5 mg clonazepam, as prescribed, as needed. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Some Helpful Antidotes I’ve Used for My Autistic Son</span></u><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">: </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">After my son was given too many “benzodiazepines” (repeated doses of ativan) inside a hospital, I bought the herb <u>Bacopa Monnieri</u>. I gave it as directed, it reversed the benzo fog. In case a health professional plagued with compulsive doubting is twisting in a chair and getting smug and uptight reading this….thinking, </span><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Gee, she’s just a parent of an autistic child, who does she think she is… what rubbish…</span></i><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">here’s evidence. Notice research is done by National Institute of Health. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Jan 13, 2008 : </span><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 11pt;">As <b>Benzodiazepines</b> are known to produce amnesia by <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span>involvement of the GABAergic system, we examined <b>Bacopa monniera</b>, <b>...</b></span><span style="font-size: 11pt;"> The degree of <u>reversa</u>l by Bacopa was <u>significant</u></span><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 11pt;"> <cite><span style="color: blue;">www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18193203</span></cite><span class="flc"> </span></span><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Antidote I’ve used at home to help my son recover after given too much Tylenol at hospital: <u>N-acetylcysteine</u>, as directed.</span><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Antidote to acetaminophen overdose is <b>N</b>-<b>acetylcysteine</b> (NAC)….<cite><span style="color: blue;">www.emedicinehealth.com/acetaminophen_<b>tylenol</b>.../article_em.htm</span></cite><span class="flc"><span style="color: blue;"> </span></span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><b><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">N</span></b><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">-<b>acetyl cysteine</b> is used to <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span>counteract acetaminophen (<b>Tylenol</b>) and carbon monoxide poisoning <cite><span style="color: blue;"><a href="http://www.webmd.com/.../ingredientmono-1018-N-ACETYL%20CYSTEINE.aspx"><span style="color: blue;">www.webmd.com/.../ingredientmono-1018-<b>N</b>-ACETYL%20CYSTEINE.aspx</span></a></span></cite></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Legal disclaimer: Please consult with a physician or other (love this next part, as if we're morons) "qualified"<span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span>healthcare provider before trying any new or suggested treatment. What is an unqualified healthcare provider?&nbsp;Your grandmother?&nbsp;Nothing here is intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent anything, though some&nbsp;information found here may cure or prevent autism&nbsp;ignorance. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Kim Oakley</span></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-1103481631348236858?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-77130783728736422952012-02-12T22:22:00.000-08:002012-02-14T12:28:22.458-08:00Non-Verbal Autism and Self-Injurious Episodes<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt; mso-ansi-language: EN;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 10 Things to Consider When Non-Verbal Autistics<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;Have&nbsp;</span>Sudden Self-Injurious Episodes:<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.75in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .75in; text-indent: -0.5in;"><span lang="EN" style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Verdana; mso-fareast-font-family: Verdana;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">1.<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><span lang="EN" style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt; mso-ansi-language: EN;">Environment. <u>Auditory</u>: Are loud noises (car alarms, dogs barking, others talking too loud, music or TV blasting) triggering behavior? <u>Olfactory</u>: Sudden onset of strong smells, such as fresh paint, perfume, popcorn in microwave? <u>Tactile</u>: Sits on chair with book on it. <u>Visual</u>: Sunlight in eyes. Scary show on TV. Frightening picture on wall? Scan area for everything possible that could startle or cause fear or discomfort. Re-direct autistic person to safe, quiet area, if needed. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.75in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .75in; text-indent: -0.5in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Verdana; mso-fareast-font-family: Verdana;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">2.<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><span lang="EN" style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt; mso-ansi-language: EN;">Clothing. Is something like underwear or diaper pinching? Pants too tight? Sleeves wet? Clothing bunched? Itchy? Sweater tag scraping neck? Check for insects, as in Ants in pants (yes, this happened once on a field trip to park). Overdressed? Underdressed? Too hot? Too cold? </span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.75in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .75in; text-indent: -0.5in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Verdana; mso-fareast-font-family: Verdana;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">3.<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt;">Shoes. Rocks, pebbles or stickers in shoe. Shoes or socks too tight. Or wet. Or have holes. Also check toe-nails. Long nails can cut other toes. Check for blisters. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.75in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .75in; text-indent: -0.5in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Verdana; mso-fareast-font-family: Verdana;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">4.<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt;">Hunger or Thirst. ESPECIALLY if autistic person is on MEDICATIONS. <u>Drug-induced hypoglycemia </u>presents with low blood sugar and cause automatic behaviors, ataxia, anxiety, dilated pupils, confusion, myoclonus, tingly skin, shakiness, sweating and heart palpitations. Such symptoms lower self-injurious threshold in a behaviorally-fragile autistic person (BFAP). Check for de-hydration. Non-verbal autistics often can’t tell you they’re thirsty. Offer frequent sips of water or juice. <u>Keep hydrated.</u> Know when they last ate. Offer food. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.75in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .75in; text-indent: -0.5in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Verdana; mso-fareast-font-family: Verdana;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">5.<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt;">Sleep deprivation. Acute or chronic. If you suspect insomnia or other sleep issues, which are common among autistics, look for appetite changes, constant yawning, changes in vision (bumping into things), off-baseline [not normal for person] distractibility, bloodshot eyes, extreme agitation, elevated histamine levels in blood (request blood test if suspected as this can also be sign of gut bacteria), hand tremors, sensitivity to cold and/or unusual re-actions to noise. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.75in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .75in; text-indent: -0.5in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Verdana; mso-fareast-font-family: Verdana;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">6.<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt;">Underlying, undetected medical issues: Infection. Allergies. Impaction. Constipation. Bladder infection. Sore throat. Ear infection. Adverse reactions to medications. <u>Cavities</u> (one of the hardest things to detect, since many severely- autistic persons with behavioral issues can’t tolerate dentist looking inside mouth, and so have to be put under general anesthesia just to have a check up). </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.75in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .75in; text-indent: -0.5in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Verdana; mso-fareast-font-family: Verdana;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">7.<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt;">Acute Injury. Stubbed toe. Scraped knee. Bumped head. Treat (apply ice packs or Bactine spray for <u>pain relief</u>, as needed). <u>Remember pain caused BY self-injury triggers MORE self-injury</u>. Do all you can to STOP the pain. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.75in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .75in; text-indent: -0.5in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Verdana; mso-fareast-font-family: Verdana;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">8.<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt;">Defensive Mechanism. Is autistic person being rushed, let’s say, to go to bus? <u>Rushed</u> to get into car? Rushed to change classrooms? <u>Forced</u> to board airplane? All these can be triggers to self-injury, as pressure and stress of situation becomes overwhelming. Slow down, if possible. Obviously, in an emergency, if you need to vacate a building, you have to move quickly, but if you can, prepare autistic person prone to self-injury by moving slowly and calmly from place to place. <u>Provide extra time and space</u> to process things. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.75in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .75in; text-indent: -0.5in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Verdana; mso-fareast-font-family: Verdana;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">9.<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt;">Boredom. Sitting in a classroom staring at wall for hours could be a trigger. <u>Staying in one place too long could trigger self-abuse</u>. Some autistics <u>get “stuck</u>.” They need re-direction. They need you to <u>help them get unstuck</u>. Introduce new assistive technology, toys and settings, as tolerated. Read to them. Try hand over hand assistance and prompting. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.75in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .75in; text-indent: -0.5in;"><br /></div><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt;"></span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.75in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .75in; text-indent: -0.5in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt; mso-bidi-font-family: Verdana; mso-fareast-font-family: Verdana;"><span style="mso-list: Ignore;">10.<span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt;">Subnutrition. <u>Chronic exposure to inadequate nutrition.</u> State and private-run facilities and other programs serving autistic populations offer junk food because it’s cheap. Common foods served include crackers, bread, chips, cake, canned vegetables, French fries, hot dogs, pizza, puddings and TV dinners. Subnutrition can also occur when autistics with nutrient absorption issues don’t receive MINCE or PUREE foods to enhance digestion. Even great food can’t be digested if it’s being swallowed whole, which some autistics tend to do. In cases where autistic won’t chew slowly, ask doctor to order <u>minced or pureed diet. Subnutrition affects mood and lowers self-injurious threshold</u>. Every bite counts. It’s essential to evaluate and improve diet and nutritional status of self-injurious autistics. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Kim Oakley February/2012</span></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-7713078372873642295?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com1tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-76871420250965426222012-02-05T10:03:00.001-08:002012-02-27T09:11:54.597-08:00Looking Back at 1982 AMA Definition of Autism<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt;">Looking Back at 1982 AMA definition of Autism. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt;">A 1982 American Medical Association (AMA), Family Medical Guide, still sits on my bookshelf. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt;">In describing autism it says, “Autism is a child’s inability, from birth—or a loss of ability within the first 30 months (not 30 years)—to develop normal relationships with anybody, even parents. What causes the disorder is not known (experts still don’t know). </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt;">As a baby the autistic child will have difficulty with feeding and toilet training…he or she will not give, or cease to give smiling recognition to parent’s face. It will become increasingly <u>apparent child lives in a world of his or her own…</u>Speech, facial expressions, or any other forms of communication are absent or unintelligible. In some cases a few words are spoken, but are repeated (echolalia)…An autistic child makes no distinction among people, other living things, and inanimate objects, and treats them all in same way (I would argue that’s more a trait of moderate to severe autism).</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt;">He or she cannot evaluate situations, and so reacts inappropriately to them (slaps, hits self)…child may become fiercely agitated (screams) if furniture is rearranged…or he or she is taken into new surroundings…same child may also run into busy street without any fear…By not communicating autistic child remains isolated…(assistive technologies now help many non-verbal autistics)…autistic children often behave unpredictably…they may be violent (or self-abusive) one moment, and then sit completely still, in some strange position (like the pretzel position my son goes into)…for hours on end. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt;">Autistic children also adopt strange postures and mannerisms (like flapping fingers) that can unsettle those around them. And although the child may be intelligent (they could be memorizing and mapping everything around them for all we know) he or she may give impression of being sub-intelligent…” </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt;">Intelligence is such an elusive concept. As we have learned over the years, there are different types of intelligence, some that can’t be measured. More and more cases of severe autism spontaneously show hidden intelligence. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 16pt;">I like the 1982 description of autism. Perhaps it’s because definitions like this were scrolled before mainstream media became obsessed with the Rain Man. Now don’t get offended. I love the character in the movie, —especially when he hits himself in the head at the airport. Would the DSM-5 task force see that as Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in an autistic person? I wonder. </span></div><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;"></span></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-7687142025096542622?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-62400817869483992162012-02-04T22:38:00.006-08:002012-03-13T17:05:50.200-07:00Autism Experts Should Consider the Rule Out Factor<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Experts know little about autism because there are no general autism experts. There are only experts in specific levels of autism. </span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;"></span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">I learned years ago not to rely on autism experts. Most seemed stuck in an ivory tower. Others I had to rely on seemed forever in a hurry to get us out the door.</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">A few years ago, several gastroenterologists&nbsp;failed to detect H-pylori, an underlying condition that was, for several months, tormenting my autistic non-verbal son. I finally asked for the test, after reseraching causes of&nbsp;stomach pain. I didn't even know there was such a test! The test was positive. He was prescribed meds. He got better. Of course, in severe autism there are multiple antecedents that trigger self-injury, but at least H-pylori wasn't one of them after treatment. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Another example, numerous neurologists who couldn’t find effective combinations of anti-seizure medications. After months of staying up for hours and studying a large body of epilepsy research, based on what I learned, I initiated adding Topiramate and discontinuing night-dose of Lamictal. This helped. (Studies had shown lamictal given at night&nbsp;can&nbsp;trigger status-myoclonus and the neurologist didn't know that). </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Several psychiatrists couldn’t find medication that reduced&nbsp;my son's&nbsp;savage self-injurious behaviors. They tried. And by no fault of their own, it's tough because he has epilepsy. No doubt it's complex. Nevertheless, I never gave up. I continued to do&nbsp;research and discovered Nicotine Patch may help. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">I figured it would help because I connected the&nbsp;FACT nicotine will increase choline in the brain to the FACT my son's FMRI showed blunted choline.&nbsp;Nicotine patch has&nbsp;helped. It doesn't end there. Most the times&nbsp;my son&nbsp;has went&nbsp;to Emergency Room, I figured out underlying etiologies. I asked for tests and treatments that helped. The times I didn't were disastrous. They would simply guess and try and get him out the door as fast as possible without proper treatment. &nbsp;</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">I have nothing against doctors. Most doctors are extremely intelligent. And want to help. I’m just a bit more intelligent about this type of autism, based on my personal experience, observation&nbsp;and understanding of this complex situation.&nbsp;Furthermore, I&nbsp;evaluate every clue, every possibility, every shred of hope. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Parents of autistic children are exhausted by “autism experts” who know little about autism. Experts who know little don't help.&nbsp;They waste your time. A credential, certificate or title doesn’t make one an autism expert. Too many autism experts hide behind titles and find places like Clinics and Centers; Institutes and Universities to hide. A hallmark trait of experts who ‘know so little’ is <u>intellectual laziness</u>.&nbsp; </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Once they get a degree and recognition, <u>they stop learning</u>. They borrow and regurgitate each other’s studies, forever adding new twists, hoping we won't notice they're leading us in circles. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Accustomed to hearing, “renowned” or “distinguished”, all&nbsp;these&nbsp;carefree autism&nbsp;experts who know nothing&nbsp;want to do lately is write papers, give lectures and serve on committees. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Experts who&nbsp;don't&nbsp;know much&nbsp;tend to lump all autistics into an unpolished autism category, claiming it’s to thwart the “over diagnosis” epidemic.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><u>I agree there’s an epidemic of over-diagnosing autism, but the answer isn’t to ignore or remove hallmark traits and characteristics of autism, especially the more "difficult features." </u>&nbsp;As in self-abuse. Or aggressive behaviors. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Better to teach doctors and psychologists to recognize disorders that are often misdiagnosed as autism. For instance, Fragile-X test can confirm mental retardation as primary diagnosis. (Ie...My son was tested twice, and it’s always negative), thus RULING out Fragile-X. </span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Ditto doctors have diagnosed children with <u>Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), as autism. FAS has a unique and distinct look</u> (<u>small eyes, flat cheeks, very thin&nbsp;upper lip, short, upturned nose</u>). It's not autism. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">&nbsp;Another disorder&nbsp;sometimes misdiagnosed as autism is Landau-Kleffner Syndrome (LKS). Children (usually between ages of 3-7 yrs old) with LKS present with sudden onset of seizures and loss of language skills. After seizures are treated with anti-epileptic medication, the LKS child’s previously viewed “autistic behavior” gradually improves. They are&nbsp;sometimes seen as "recovery" stories of autism. You feel great for the kids, but it's not an accurate portrayal of&nbsp;autism. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Still other disorders misdiagnosed as autism are ADHD, Rett Syndrome and, rarely,&nbsp;Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD). Donna Williams, an “autistic adult” who has written books, has, by her own admission, stated she’s now been diagnosed with Disassociate Identity Disorder (DID), which is another term of MPD.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Then there is the most bizzare case of Amanda Baggs, a woman who most assurdely&nbsp;is a case study in abnormal psychiatry.&nbsp;Research shows she was very different in her teen years than she is in her You Tube Video. </span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><a href="http://webspace.newschool.edu/~simod979/IDEAS_D.Simons.March2010.pdf" style="color: #0000cc; text-decoration: underline;">http://webspace.newschool.edu/~simod979/IDEAS_D.Simons.March2010.pdf</a>.</span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><a href="http://autismfraud.blogspot.com/2008/02/letter-about-amanda-baggs-fraud.html">http://autismfraud.blogspot.com/2008/02/letter-about-amanda-baggs-fraud.html</a></span><br /><br /><a href="http://blogs.jwatch.org/general-medicine/index.php/2011/01/autism-whats-the-truth/" modo="false" style="color: #0000cc; text-decoration: underline;">http://blogs.jwatch.org/general-medicine/index.php/2011/01/autism-whats-the-truth/</a>.<br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">To be fair, there are&nbsp;also rare cases where a child or adult&nbsp;with authentic&nbsp;autism or Aspergers&nbsp;is diagnosed with something different and needs to be re-diagnosed.&nbsp;&nbsp;Baggs is a sad case of drug-induced brain damage. I hope she finds healing. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Bottom line is <u>an autism diagnosis should not be easy to make</u>. Mild or Severe autism is a complex disorder typically diagnosed in childhood.&nbsp;</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">&nbsp;Reaching an autism diagnosis involves intelligent analysis, expert knowledge, careful consideration and <u>a process of elimination to ensure accuracy in diagnosing</u>. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">A child, who likes to spin, loses his words and lines up Legos, isn’t necessarily autistic. He/she could be having sub-clinical seizures, suffering from a metabolic disorder or have&nbsp;a&nbsp;genetic condition.&nbsp;When my son began smashing his fists into his head as a toddler, I had him tested for Lesch-Nyhan Disorder&nbsp;(</span><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;"> inherited disease caused by a deficiency of the HGPRT enzyme, produced by mutations in the HPRT gene located on the X chromosome, which causes a build-up of uric acid in all bodily fluids). Tested, twice, and both times negative, thus giving us a clearer picture of autism with self-injurious behaviors not rooted in another disorder. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><u>Before arriving to autism diagnosis,</u> <u>all possible etiologies should be explored, tested and ruled out.</u> <em>Oh, but that's costly. So it's cheaper to slap on&nbsp;autism label?</em><em>&nbsp;</em>As I've said again and again, since the age of 2, I have pushed for an unbelievable amount of testing to rule out other factors involved in my son’s case, thus ensuring acutal autism. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">It is <u>EXTREMELY rare a parent or professional does this</u>. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">The topic of RULING OUT other factors besides autism, isn't a popular topic. We aren't hearing autism experts like Catherine Lord, Ph.D (bless her tired, greedy heart)&nbsp;discuss it because she has no vested financial interest in a doctor making an accurate autism diagnosis, only doctors who will use her ADOS instrument so she can get more royalities&nbsp;from her invention. Am I right? Sorry Catherine, no disrespect. Money and&nbsp;the allure of fame&nbsp;is a strange motivator. It makes people say and do things they normally wouldn't do. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Catherine Lord's ADOS invention:Source:<span style="color: #0e774a;">en.wikipedia.org/wiki/<b>Autism</b>_<b>Diagnostic</b>_Observation_Schedule</span></span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">The <b>Autism Diagnostic</b> Observation Schedule is an <b>instrument</b> for <b>diagnosing</b> and <br />assessing <b>Autism</b>. It was created by <b>Catherine Lord</b>, Ph.D., </span></span><br /><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Too many professionals&nbsp;today are quick to make the autism diagnosis without ruling out other possibilities. </span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;"></span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Because I've pushed for testing, including a plethora of genetic tests (they are still improving these tests)&nbsp;and MRI's and CT scans (all of which show no structural abnormality) my son’s case is perhaps one of the <u>most well-documented honest, factual and authentic cases of severe autism you will find.</u> </span><br /><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Still, all this said, we can't forget that even if a child&nbsp;is misdiagnosed with autism, it's still important to find treatment and help the child. Losing an autism diagnosis shouldn't mean losing&nbsp;needed supports and services. &nbsp;</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">What will it take to get these experts who know little to know more? </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Is the DSM-5 team or “task-force” ready to evaluate realities of autism? To bring up topics of "ruling out" other disorders? Why dont' they discuss this?It seems a no brainer. Hello. You'd want to rule out other things. Let’s hope they get talking. The autism community can’t afford another “expert-driven” autism intelligence failure. </span><span style="font-family: Times;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Times; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman';">Kim Oakley has a Master’s Degree in Cross-Cultural Education. She has never been addressed as “my esteemed colleague”.<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span>She has never been called “distinguished” or “renowned” –though she’s been called a lot of other things. Ms. Oakley can read, recycle, write, mop, play soccer, play charades, speaks Spanish and knows a little German, but is NOT an expert in a darn thing except understanding and helping treat severe autism with self-injurious behavior and seizures. </span></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-6240081786948399216?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-12901980844952945842012-01-31T19:29:00.000-08:002012-02-17T15:27:31.252-08:00DSM-5 Autistic Spectrum Disorder Disaster<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Has the American Psychiatric Association (APA) Lost It’s Collective Mind? Have the “36,000 Physician Leaders in mental health” ignored history? After all, decades of autism research show self-injurious behavior is a hallmark trait of severe autism. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Hundreds of research studies have been published on autism and self-injurious behavior. Hundreds of papers are written about autistics who present with self-injurious behavior. Thousands of experts have discussed the challenges of self-injury among autistics. Yet, today, you see no mention of self-injurious behavior in DSM-5 autism diagnosis. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Yes, the modern mental health leaders of the APA would have us believe autism with self-injurious behaviors doesn’t exist. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">I call into question the professional integrity of&nbsp;some involved in pushing the autism diagnosis of the DSM-5. Indeed, the revised autism diagnosis illuminates the work of scrambled, shuffled and compromised thinking—the work of individuals who know little, or don’t want to know much, about autism with self-injurious behavior, but would have us believe, they do. They don’t. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">This over-intellectualized mess believed—by some— to be a diagnostic masterpiece in making, is insulting to severely-autistic community. I don’t know what the alleged professionals revising DSM drink when&nbsp;sitting around conference tables to discuss autism diagnosis, but someone should investigate. It’s not Kosher. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Furthermore, we must ask:</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Why does APA include “flapping fingers” in Asperger’s Diagnosis, but omit “flapping fingers” from autism diagnosis? </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Why does APA omit self-injurious behavior from Level One (most severe) category of autism spectrum disorder? </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Why does APA create a new category called: “Non-suicidal self-injury,” which excludes persons with autism and self-injury? </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Why does APA ignore clear, common traits and characteristics of low-functioning autism? </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Studies show High-functioning autistics may struggle with self-injurious behaviors. So, are we to forget autistic people may have self-injurious behaviors? <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">APA hopes we’ll forget and drift into Abstractland. </i><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Does APA forget some autistics have aggressive outbursts? <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Yes, they’re probably drinking around that darn table again.</i> </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Are we to forget that severe behaviors are, and have always been, a hallmark trait of severe or “classic” autism? <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">No, we should never forget. </i>Also remember: SIB is NOT a hallmark trait of high-functioning autism, but it CAN be an issue. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Is the APA scared of addressing autism and self-injurious behaviors due to challenges, costs and complexity of treating self-injurious behaviors among autistics? <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Yes. Yes. Yes. Research shows an embarrassing failure of treating self-injurious behaviors among autistics.</i></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Why would APA try and shift severe autism with behavioral issues into an ‘intellectual disability’ category, especially when high-functioning autistics and highly-intelligent NON-autistics exhibit self-injury? </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Hence, S<u>elf-injurious behavior disorder isn’t rooted in intellectual ability.</u> </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Are some professionals who work with autistic children terrified and contemptuous of severe behavioral issues? <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Yes.</i> Do some professionals prefer, even demand and orchestrate, working with ONLY the highest functioning autistics with mild to no behaviors because it makes their job easier? <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Yes.</i> Yes. Yes. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Are college students being taught to view autism from a false definition? <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Yes.</i> </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">What’s happening to research on autism and self-injurious behavior? <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">It’s disappearing.</i> Autism research today focuses on high-functioning autism with few behavioral issues. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Has the autism diagnosis been romanticized by movies and news? <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Yes.</i> Not one Hollywood Producer has shown the courage to tackle severe autism with severe behavioral issues. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Do some Directors of Autism Clinics lack skills to discern different levels of autism? <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Yes.</i> </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">For instance, let’s take a look at one recent statement from a Kirsten Schaper. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>Schaper is a speech-language pathologist and Director of a small Autism Clinic in Illinois: <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span></span><i><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana;">“</span></i>We do have a lot of referrals for [autistic] kids for challenging behaviors, tantrums, head-banging, aggression, self-injury, but these are not characteristics of autism spectrum disorder," Schaper said. </div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Shape up Schaper, you don’t know what you’re talking about…</i></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-margin-bottom-alt: auto; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-style: italic;">“Self-Injurious Behaviors in AUTISM </span><span style="font-family: Arial;">have multiple topographies with different biochemical and social environment causes and effects. The most common topographies of these behaviors include, but are not limited to head-banging, head-hitting, face-punching/slapping, hand-biting and excessive self-rubbing and scratching…” <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>(Edelson, 1999; <span class="byline">Schroeder, et al. 2002).</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-style: italic;">Schaper’s ignorance of behaviors in autism is astonishing. Autism presenting with behaviors is out of Schaper’s league of expertise so she pretends behaviors don’t exist among autistics, and hopes, with revisions to diagnosis, these autistics will become someone else’s burden.&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-style: italic;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-bidi-font-style: italic;">Historical evidence of self-injurious behavior among autistics has been studied for years. We must never forget it, as these autistics need extensive support and tolerance, lest they be cast into abstract jargonland and forgotten. I would hope, given unique connections, the highest-functioning autistics, as well as persons with HF Asperger’s, would be advocates for severely-afflicted autistics who can’t advocate for themselves. </span><span lang="EN" style="color: #666666; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt; mso-ansi-language: EN; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><ol style="margin-top: 0in;" type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><b><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Autism</span></b><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"> Research Review International, 2001, Vol. 15, No. 4, page 3. Controlling <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span><b>self</b>-<b>injurious</b> and assaultive <b>behavior</b> in <b>autism</b>. <b>Bernard Rimland</b>, Ph.D. <b></b></span></li><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Fact sheet on <b>self</b>-<b>injurious behavior</b> and <b>Autism</b> <b>....</b> Auditory integration training <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span>has also been shown to reduce sound sensitivity (<b>Rimland</b> &amp; Edelson, 1994).<b></b></span></li><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Characterization and Treatment of <b>Self</b>-<b>Injurious Behavior</b>. <b>...</b> Source: <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span><b>Journal of Autism</b> and Developmental Disorders, v30 n5 p447-50 Oct 2000<b></b></span></li><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Risk factors for <b>self</b>-<b>injurious behaviors</b> among 222 young children with <b>autistic</b> <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span>disorders. <b>Journal</b> of Intellectual Disability Research , 47, 622-627.<b></b></span></li><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Some argue an autistic person who exhibits self-injury is intellectually disabled, yet we find High functioning autistics and people with Aspergers struggle with self-injurious behaviors. <b></b></span></li><li class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Jan 1, 2002 <b>...</b> It also serves as an illustration of how aggression and <b>self</b>-<b>injury</b> can be <b>.....</b> The <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span>changes in these <b>behaviors</b> in individuals with both <b>Asperger's</b> <b>...</b></span></li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt 0.25in;"><b><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span></span></b><cite><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #0e774a;">Source: ajp.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleID=175265</span></span></cite><span class="flc"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"> <b></b></span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span class="flc"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span>7. </span></span><b><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Asperger</span></b><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"> syndrome is often considered a high functioning form of autism. <b>...</b> to <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span>people; <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span>odd or peculiar speech; Has <b>behavior</b> that may lead to <b>self</b>-<b>harm</b> <b>..</b><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;">www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001549.htm</span></cite><span class="flc"> </span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span class="flc"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span>8. </span></span><b><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Aspergers</span></b><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"> diagnosis in adults will come from symptoms such as violent <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span>outbursts, hypersensitivity to sensory stimuli, rituals, <b>self</b>-<b>injurious behavior</b>, odd ….<b>...</b><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;">www.<b>aspergers</b>news.com/<b>Aspergers</b>-Diagnosis.html</span></cite><span class="flc"> –</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span class="flc"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span>9. </span></span><b><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Self</span></b><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">-<b>injurious behavior</b> is one of the most devastating behaviors exhibited by <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span>people with autism <b>.....</b> <b>Journal of Autism</b> and Developmental Disorders, 18, 99-117.</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span>10. </span><span class="byline"><span style="font-family: Arial;">In <b style="mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">autism,</b> self-</span></span><span style="font-family: Arial;">injurious behaviors are one of the most concerning forms of lower-level repetitive stereotypic behaviors (RSB) (Bishop and Kleinke, 2007)</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Arial;">11. <span lang="EN" style="color: #666666; font-family: Arial; font-size: 9pt; mso-ansi-language: EN;">Allen Frances: “<u>Severe, classic autism is clearly defined and absolutely unmistakable</u>. But, at the milder end of its spectrum, autism has inherently fuzzy boundaries merging imperceptibly into many other childhood mental heath, behavioral, and learning problems and is also difficult to distinguish from the individual differences that are a normal and (even desirable) result of human variability”. Huffington Post </span></span><br /><span style="font-family: Arial;"><span lang="EN" style="color: #666666; font-family: Arial; font-size: 9pt; mso-ansi-language: EN;">12. <span style="color: black;">In most cases, though, <b>severe autism</b> is marked by a complete inability to <br />communicate or interact with other <b>....</b> <b>Journal of Autism</b> and Developmental <br />Disorders.&nbsp; Source: </span><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;">www.mayoclinic.com/health/<b>autism</b>/.../DSECTION=symptoms</span></cite><span class="flc"> - </span></span></span><br /><br /><span style="color: #666666; font-family: Arial;">13. Autism Research Review International, <u><strong>2001</strong></u>, Vol. 15, No. 4, page 3</span><br /><div id="cke_pastebin">Controlling self-injurious and assaultive behavior in autism</div><div id="cke_pastebin"></div><div id="cke_pastebin">Written by Dr. Bernard Rimland, Ph.D.</div><div id="cke_pastebin">Autism Research Institute</div><div>&nbsp;"Nothing is more difficult for the parents of autistic children to tolerate than self-injurious and assaultive behavior (SIB/A). SIB/A behaviors are unpleasant to observe, to think about, or to discuss, but they do exist, and must be dealt with. Some autistic children hit their heads against walls or floors so hard that they have fractured their skulls, detached their retinas, or caused deafness. Others hit themselves with their fists or their knees so hard that they have broken noses, deformed ears, and even blinded themselves. Some children bite themselves and others, and hit other children and their parents with such violence they have broken bones." </div><div></div><div>WAKE UP APA...please, wake up. Researchers who devote their time and effort into studying autism and self-injurious behavior deserve some credit. You can't ignore their research. <br /><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; mso-layout-grid-align: none;"><span style="font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT; font-size: 11pt; mso-bidi-font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT;">While some people with autism are mildly affected, most people with the condition will require lifelong supervision and care and have significant language impairments. In the most severe cases, affected children exhibit repetitive, aggressive and self-injurious behavior. This behavior may persist over time and prove very difficult to change, posing a tremendous challenge to those who must live with, treat, teach and care for these individuals. Source: <a href="http://public.tgen.org/tgen.org/downloads/autism/AutismFAQ.pdf">http://public.tgen.org/tgen.org/downloads/autism/AutismFAQ.pdf</a></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Treatment of <b>Autism</b> Spectrum Disorders. <b>....</b> <b>Catherine</b> E. <b>Lord</b>, Ph.D. <b>......</b> Problem <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span><b>behaviors</b> may include but are not restricted to <b>self</b>-<b>injury</b>, aggression, dis- <b>...</b><cite><span style="color: #0e774a;">www.national<b>autism</b>center.org/pdf/NAC%20Standards%20Report.pdf</span></cite><span class="flc"> </span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt -0.25in; mso-outline-level: 4;"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><a href="http://www.google.com/url?q=http://autismsciencefoundation.wordpress.com/2011/09/27/dr-joseph-buxbaum-and-dr-bryan-king-join-our-sab/&amp;sa=U&amp;ei=m90-T7bzIcS22gXKr8CbCA&amp;ved=0CBoQFjAEOAo&amp;sig2=xamXCBfZZ0dx4xOoHFcCPw&amp;usg=AFQjCNGnWPpSzuNiaqkaJjIwtKrHEXLdCw"><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';"><span style="color: blue;">Dr. Joseph Buxbaum and Dr. - <b>Autism</b> Science Foundation</span></span></a><a href="javascript:void(0)" id="LXPLSS_69359585U1"><span style="border-bottom: windowtext 1pt; border-left: windowtext 1pt; border-right: windowtext 1pt; border-top: windowtext 1pt; mso-border-alt: none windowtext 0in; padding-bottom: 0in; padding-left: 0in; padding-right: 0in; padding-top: 0in; text-decoration: none; text-underline: none;"><shapetype coordsize="21600,21600" filled="f" id="_x0000_t75" o:preferrelative="t" o:spt="75" path="m@4@5l@4@11@9@11@9@5xe" stroked="f"><span style="color: blue;"> <stroke joinstyle="miter"></stroke><formulas><f eqn="if lineDrawn pixelLineWidth 0"></f><f eqn="sum @0 1 0"></f><f eqn="sum 0 0 @1"></f><f eqn="prod @2 1 2"></f><f eqn="prod @3 21600 pixelWidth"></f><f eqn="prod @3 21600 pixelHeight"></f><f eqn="sum @0 0 1"></f><f eqn="prod @6 1 2"></f><f eqn="prod @7 21600 pixelWidth"></f><f eqn="sum @8 21600 0"></f><f eqn="prod @7 21600 pixelHeight"></f><f eqn="sum @10 21600 0"></f></formulas><path gradientshapeok="t" o:connecttype="rect" o:extrusionok="f"></path><lock aspectratio="t" v:ext="edit"></lock></span></shapetype><shape alt="" href="javascript:void(0)" id="XPLSS_69359585U1" o:button="t" o:spid="_x0000_i1025" style="height: 15pt; width: 15pt;" type="#_x0000_t75"></shape></span></a></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">September 27, 2011 by <b>autismsciencefoundation</b> <b>...</b> York Institute for Basic <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span>Research); Dr. <b>Catherine Lord</b> (New York Institute for Brain Development); Dr. <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span>David Mandell (University <b>...</b> His primary focus is repetitive <b>self</b>-<b>injurious behavior</b> <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span>(SIB).</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="color: #0e774a;"><cite><b><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">autism</span></b></cite><cite><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">sciencefoundation.wordpress.com/.../dr-joseph-buxbaum-and-dr-bryan<wbr>-king-join-our-sab/</span></cite></span><span class="flc"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"> - </span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt -0.25in; mso-outline-level: 4;"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><a href="http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.autism.com/ind_self-injurious_behavior.asp&amp;sa=U&amp;ei=4d4-T8XCBaqG2gWspv2mCQ&amp;ved=0CBsQFjAEOBQ&amp;sig2=ujQcOC50CVlAE2Cs6HI5xA&amp;usg=AFQjCNEM_e9Jfi5g8XE6N4e3LGAUGAQjIg"><span style="color: blue;"><b><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">Self</span></b><span style="font-family: 'Times New Roman';">-<b>Injurious Behavior</b> : Autism <b>Research</b> Institute</span></span></a><a href="javascript:void(0)" id="LXPLSS_1921030104U1"><span style="border-bottom: windowtext 1pt; border-left: windowtext 1pt; border-right: windowtext 1pt; border-top: windowtext 1pt; mso-border-alt: none windowtext 0in; padding-bottom: 0in; padding-left: 0in; padding-right: 0in; padding-top: 0in; text-decoration: none; text-underline: none;"><shape alt="" href="javascript:void(0)" id="XPLSS_1921030104U1" o:button="t" o:spid="_x0000_i1026" style="height: 15pt; width: 15pt;" type="#_x0000_t75"><span style="color: blue;"></span></shape></span></a></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Autism <b>Research</b> Institute | Autism is Treatable <b>...</b> <b>Self</b>-<b>injurious behavior</b> often <span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span>refers to any behavior that can cause tissue damage, such as bruises, redness, <b>...</b></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><cite><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"><span style="color: #0e774a;">www.autism.com/ind_<b>self</b>-<b>injurious</b>_<b>behavior</b>.asp</span></span></cite><span class="flc"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"> -</span></span><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 10.5pt;"><b><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;">Behavior</span></b><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"> analytic <b>research</b> on dementia in older adults. <b>....</b> treatment for the <b>self</b>-<span style="display: none; mso-hide: all;"><br /></span><b>injurious</b> skin picking of a young man with <b>Asperger</b> syndrome. <cite><span style="color: #0e774a;">seab.envmed.rochester.edu/jaba/articles_selected/</span></cite><span class="flc"> </span></span></div><br /><br /></div></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-1290198084495294584?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com7tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-18976881717618881302012-01-27T05:22:00.000-08:002012-02-05T07:28:42.100-08:00Budget Cuts Put Persons with Severe Autism at Risk<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Prejudicial attitudes towards persons with special&nbsp;needs that exist today have foundations in historical influences. It's important to understand this history and what kind of people are behind it. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">In Ancient Rome, entertainment at the Coliseum included throwing disabled children under horses. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">In the 18th and 19th centuries, 'ships of fools'- containing mentally and physically-disabled children and adults— sailed from port to port, where people would gather and pay to laugh at them.</span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">In Nazi Germany, films such as “Ich klage an”, painted disabled people as 'useless eaters', a burden on the state. Eliminating disabled persons became known as “T4”. Today, we call it “making painful cuts.” </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">For the record, did you know Winston Churchill was a supporter of the British Eugenics Society, as were Sidney and Beatrice Webb, founders of Labor Party, and many other influential “intellectuals” of the left and right? Other eugenics supporters included authors D.H. Lawrence, and the economist John Maynard Keynes. Given such pernicious attitudes, we can see why, back in early 1900’s, Queen Mary and King George V hid their epileptic son with mild autism (see the BBC drama, “The Lost Prince).</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">History also shows, under the UK Mental Deficiency Act of 1913, two of the Queen Mother's cousins were incarcerated. </span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Similar laws in America had led to President Kennedy's sister kept in an institution and having a frontal lobotomy.&nbsp;<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span></span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">So now you’re thinking <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">but we’ve come so far from these horrible times.</i> Yes, we have. That’s why we can’t tolerate politicians using psychological manipulation to justify “eliminating” funds from programs that help severely-autistic children and adults. Making “painful cuts” to programs that help individuals and families living with autism is like pretending autism doesn’t exist. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Maybe that’s what&nbsp;some elitists want? After all, the world is, in their mind, their playground and they don't like to share. Furthermore, they feel they alone know what's best for mankind. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Do not be fooled by policy makers using psychological manipulation. Do not be fooled by politicians with superficial sympathy and excessive apology. These are ruthless, cunning people of power who conceal true intentions. Those who advocate targeting “painful cuts” to the most vulnerable of our society will lie, deny, rationalize, vilify, shame and divert, before every American, to make their “painful cuts.” Total con-artists.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">It’s up to&nbsp;those who know better&nbsp;to stop every attempt at eliminating every cent from every program that helps the elderly, poor and disabled of our society. What politicians like Governor Jerry Brown don’t understand about parents of, let's say,&nbsp;autistic children and adults, is that we aren’t&nbsp;fooled by politicans like him. We've been through too much reality to believe the unrealities presented to us. </span><br /><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Let's take a painful look at Governor Jerry Brown.&nbsp;NOTICE&nbsp;AFTER he announces “painful cuts” to programs, he&nbsp;LATER announces, “At a time when children, the disabled and seniors face painful cuts to essential programs, the state of California cannot justify a massive expenditure of public dollars for the worst criminals.” </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Notice how Brown&nbsp;shifts&nbsp;onto&nbsp;a new&nbsp;subject of 'criminals on death row',&nbsp;&nbsp;as if expenditure on criminals is to blame for the pen in his hands making cuts to disabled programs. </span><br /><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">The good news is that God is on the side of the most vulnerable in society. And He expects those, who by the grace of God, aren’t so vulnerable, to be their voices. </span><br /><br />“Speak up for those who cannot speak for themselves; ensure justice for those being crushed. Yes, speak up for the poor and helpless, and see that they get justice…” Proverbs 31-8-9<br /><br />Kim Oakley<span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;"></span></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-1897688171761888130?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com0tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-88218107089670320502011-12-01T16:01:00.000-08:002012-02-17T16:34:27.263-08:00Autism Research: Is it Helping?<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Georgia;">There’s a lot of autism research going on. Are studies helping autistic individuals? Let's take a look at some of the studies out there:</span><br /><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><u><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Georgia;"></span></u></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Study Links Low Birth Weight to Autism</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Studies Seek Reason for Autism Rise<span style="color: #333333;"></span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Georgia;">Study links Extra Brain Cells to Autism</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Georgia;">Study links Anti-Depressants to Autism</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Georgia;">Study links Autism to Vaccines</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Georgia;">Report Says Vaccines Don’t Cause Autism</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Georgia;">Report Says Possible Genetic Link to Autism Identified (</span><span style="color: black; font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;">TBL1X) </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Autism linked to too many brain cells. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Controversial Study Shows Mild Autism and Atheism Linked </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Intelligent Parents Have Higher Risk of Having Autistic Children</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Wealthier Parents More Likely to Have Autistic Children </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">New Findings Emerge in Multiple Autism Studies</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Most Meds Don’t Help Autism Study Shows </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Study Shows Autistic Brains Heavier </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Autism Brains Organized Differently, say scientists</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Autism Offers Distinct Advantages, Researcher Says </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Mercury in Vaccines as a Cause for Autism</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Major Stress During Pregnancy Linked to Autism </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Scientists Say Autism Has a Genetic Component </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Pollutions Plays a Role in Autism <u>and</u> Dyslexia (love how they mix the two labels, as if studying autism alone isn’t complex enough)</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">Study Shows More Neurons in Pre-Frontal Cortex of Autistic Boys (I like this study…more helpful than most, at least in my son’s case)</span><br /><br /><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">And the list of studies goes on and on.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia;"></span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="mso-ansi-language: EN;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;">As if some people working over there need anti-psychotics, the National Institute of Mental Health says, “Autism studies hold the best promise of revealing what causes autism, how it might be prevented, what treatments are effective, and are…critically important to improving the lives of people with ASD and their families.” </span></span><span class="flc"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 10pt;"></span></span></div></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-margin-top-alt: auto;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Georgia;">What do these studies have in common? </span></div><ol type="1"><li class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; color: black; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; mso-margin-top-alt: auto; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;">At the end of every study it often says, “Further studies needed…” At some point, it’d be nice if someone said, “Look, researchers. You’ve got one year and ten rats, and this much funding to figure this stuff out. Win some points. If you can’t. You’re fired.” Kind of like the way you handle football coaches who have too many losing seasons. Never will you hear, “Lost season, weather and attitude may be factors, further game playing needed.” I&nbsp; know, I know, there are super researchers who care and try hard to find answers. I'm not talking about them. I'm talking about frauds in&nbsp;autism community&nbsp;who get federal grants to research autism and then alter data and use grant money for personal gain. I'm talking about researchers who don't give a damn about autistic individuals. And who waste time, money and energy. I'm talking researchers who fabricate and falsify research. </span></li><li class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; color: black; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; mso-margin-top-alt: auto; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;">Little tangible hope in autism studies. Just gathering and guessing. Or regurgitating information from older autism studies. Autism research should be fresh and relevant to the autistic population’s most pressing needs.</span></li><li class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; color: black; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; mso-margin-top-alt: auto; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;">Few quality controls over autism studies. </span></li><li class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; color: black; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; mso-margin-top-alt: auto; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 10pt;">Nothing&nbsp;seems confirmed in studies, merely speculations dangled, until next study, where more speculation is dangled and more studying is needed to study the dangled speculations </span></li><li class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; color: black; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; mso-margin-top-alt: auto; tab-stops: list .5in;">Autism Research Institute (ARI) is the&nbsp;only&nbsp;US autism organization to receive a <u>four-star rating</u> for <u>fiscal responsibility</u> from Charity Navigator. Has anybody&nbsp;investigated WHY other autism organizations haven't received a four star? &nbsp;</li></ol><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; color: black; line-height: 18pt; margin: 0in 0in 0.25in; mso-list: l0 level1 lfo1; mso-margin-top-alt: auto; tab-stops: list .5in;"><span style="font-family: Georgia;">From my experience, studies that lead to better autism treatments and cures are often <u>done by researchers in other fields</u>. Yes, it’s true. I find the most helpful things for my helping my son by exploring other research studies. Example, the nicotine patch is used on Alzheimer’s patients. What do Alzheimer patients and some autistics have in common? Blunted choline. So, I figured if a study showed nicotine patch is used to elevate choline in elderly people with dementia who have blunted choline, the nicotine patch may help my autistic son. And nicotine (7mg patch daily, 14 mg patch, as needed) has helped. Since July of 2011, my son is more alert and shows higher cognition, which reduces frustration, thus helps decrease self-abuse, though he still hits himself if he’s sick or startled by loud noises and in some ways, the higher cognition has been more challenging, as he’s doing more things, like trying to run! So, I’m happy and surprised that something so bizarre, like nicotine, is a promising therapy. This encourages me to keeping looking in areas that you don’t normally expect to find clues that lead to better treatments for things like self-injurious behavior and/or seizures in autism. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Georgia;">Kim Oakley<span style="color: black; font-size: 10pt;"></span></span></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-8821810708967032050?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-91375793241548562902011-11-28T00:53:00.000-08:002011-12-01T15:49:04.123-08:00Autism Moms and Stress Like Soldiers?<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN" style="font-family: Verdana; mso-ansi-language: EN;">What is it about raising an autistic child that causes unusual stress? </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN-GB" style="color: black; font-family: Verdana; mso-ansi-language: EN-GB; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Researchers followed a group of moms of adolescents and adults with autism. </span><span lang="EN" style="font-family: Verdana; mso-ansi-language: EN;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN-GB" style="color: black; font-family: Verdana; mso-ansi-language: EN-GB; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">"Mothers of autistic children with high levels of <u>behavior problems</u> have pronounced physiological profiles of chronic stress…” said Marsha Mailick Seltzer, a researcher at the University of Wisconsin. <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Got that right sister. Should’ve come to dinner last year.</i> After I heard a bump that I thought was my son having a seizure, my nerves exploded and I ended up tossing my plate of Shepard’s Pie (not just the food) in the garbage and then fleeing upstairs, where I sat on my bathroom floor and tore out my hair. You’d think upon learning it wasn’t a seizure, I would’ve been relieved. Yet, I was shocked. And angry my body went into crisis mode when it wasn’t a crisis. Had it been a true emergency I wouldn’t have been so upset. I would’ve remained calm, responded, protected and treated, like I have so many times. Why did I respond like this? What the heck was wrong with me? </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span lang="EN-GB" style="color: black; font-family: Verdana; mso-ansi-language: EN-GB; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Studies show a greater level of stress in mothers of autistic children than compared to mothers of children with other developmental disabilities (White and Hastings, 2004; Weiss, 2002). Another study shows higher rates of anxiety among mothers of autistic boys (Korean Academy of Medical Science, 2002). </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><span style="color: black; font-family: Verdana; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Stress, based on severity of autism, is </span><span lang="EN-GB" style="color: black; font-family: Verdana; mso-ansi-language: EN-GB; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">not a subject we hear much about in the autism community, as if all autistics were equally stressful (of course it’s not the autistic individual’s fault). But it’s a reality.&nbsp;A reality the mainstream&nbsp;media--obsessed with showing autistics "cured" and autistics happily "playing IPADs" and chatting to reporters-- doesn't help to promote.</span><br /><br /><span lang="EN-GB" style="color: black; font-family: Verdana; mso-ansi-language: EN-GB; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">&nbsp;“A hormone associated with stress is extremely low in moms of [severely]-autistic children …consistent with people experiencing chronic stress such as soldiers in combat,” said Seltzer. Stress like combat soldiers? </span><br /><br /><span lang="EN-GB" style="color: black; font-family: Verdana; mso-ansi-language: EN-GB; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Maybe that explains once, when triggered by hearing bumps and crashing that I thought was my son hitting his head—but turned out to be a dog’s tail tapping the outside wall— I started shaking and felt the room spin.</span><br /><span lang="EN-GB" style="color: black; font-family: Verdana; mso-ansi-language: EN-GB; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Maybe it explains one nurse, who worked with my autistic son 50 hours a week, jumped when he heard thumping, even when he wasn’t working. “I’ve woke up in a sweat, thinking I had to protect him,” said the nurse. </span><br /><span lang="EN-GB" style="color: black; font-family: Verdana; mso-ansi-language: EN-GB; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">And maybe it explains the day I tore apart the kitchen and suddenly punched myself repeatedly in the face. It was around 8pm. I had been trying to make dinner, but was interrupted at least 8 times by people in and out of the kitchen. My son had just gotten home from a week long hospital stay. It had been a nightmare stay. A doctor, who knew nothing about severe autism, had released my son under-treated. I could hear our home health nurse telling my autistic son “stop hitting your face,” which further rattled me, since the reason my son had gone to the hospital was to find out why he was on a two week self-hitting bender. A bender obviously rooted in undetected pain. I remember chopping salad. I could hear slapping sounds. Banging. Screams. A table fell over. Though two family members had gone to help the nurse, I began shaking, dropping plates. When one of my other kids darted in the kitchen and grazed the coffee pot, and it shattered on the floor, I remember running upstairs. Shutting my bedroom door and beating the&nbsp;tar out of myself. And it felt soothing. <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Stress like combat soldiers.</i> </span><br /><br /><span lang="EN-GB" style="color: black; font-family: Verdana; mso-ansi-language: EN-GB; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">Maybe that also explains why I once scolded a child for bouncing a ball around Wal Mart. The sound reminded me of my autistic son’s head punching. It threw me into a panic. I thought I had to respond. It took me a few seconds to re-orientate and realize that my son was even around. </span><br /><br /><span lang="EN-GB" style="color: black; font-family: Verdana; mso-ansi-language: EN-GB; mso-bidi-font-family: Arial;">And maybe it explains why I once took off running at midnight, during a thunderstorm; half dressed, screaming at God. I had been alone handling my son’s seizures and self-injury for 24 hours. I remember the stress had progressed into the walls seeming like compactors and the ceiling like cement. I felt helpless. All I wanted was my son to smile, to be happy, safe. There hadn’t been much of a pass down to the incoming respite worker. “There’s been a lot of SIB,” I said, practically sprinting out the door. I ran for hours. I ran until even my dogs stopped running and looked at me like I was crazy. I didn’t feel crazy. Despite the wet, wind-whipped darkness, I had returned home calm, clear and refreshed. <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Stress like combat soldiers. </i></span><br /><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">University of Washington Autism Center studied stress among autism moms. </span><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-family: Verdana; mso-ansi-language: EN-GB;">Parents</span><span style="font-family: Verdana;"> in the autism group had “higher levels of parenting stress and psychological distress compared to moms of children with disabilities without autism”. Researchers would’ve studied dads, but apparently fathers weren’t as likely to fill out questionnaires. I’m guessing dads were busy working outside the home. Or it was a task better assigned to mother. Autism dads shouldn’t be looked at negatively. Many fathers of autistic children, such as Harold Doherty, author of the BLOG titled, “Facing Autism in New Brunswick,” are strong advocates and remain active in their autistic child’s life. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Stress like combat soldiers. How is it that even a nurse who worked with my son developed PTSD type behaviors? I’ll tell you why: Because of the severity and intensity of the situation. Parents of mildly autistic children or autistics with mild behavioral issues won’t experience ‘stress like combat soldiers’. And should be thankful. So let’s not pretend all autistic children are equally challenging and demand equal levels of supports and services. The greater degree of autism, the greater level of stress, is a reality supported by research. It is not a reality supported by mainstream media. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Are there any positive sides of all the stress caused by raising an autistic child? Yes. Not all stress is bad. My autistic son is an amazing, resilient, intelligent person, stressful inducing or not. Alas, stress, you can’t avoid it. The good news is stress builds character. Stress makes us tougher. Stress teaches us to be patient. Stress pushes us to find treatment. Seek answers. And cling to faith. Stress makes us fight for justice. Demand change. Dare to hope. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Stress reminds us that we still live in a society far from understanding and treating severe autism. Stress reminds us of unmet needs to provide support for autism moms and dads experiencing “stress like combat soldiers.”<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">What’s helped our family cope? RESPITE: Without Disability Right’s of California Attorneys helping us win more in-home respite, we would’ve surely ended up in straight jackets. So getting appropriate respite for our autistic son’s unique needs was and continues to be&nbsp;a <u>major help, for all</u>. </span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Secondly, maintaining a sense of humor. Without humor, you drown in anger and grief (We love Robin Williams, Will Ferrell and Chris Farley movies); Third, watch your diet.&nbsp;Consume more Wild Salmon, organic meats, eggs, yogurt, green drinks, Green Tea, cottage cheese, string cheese, water, coconut milk, walnuts, almonds, apples, carrots and bananas. Fourth, get more exercise.</span><br /><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Fifth, strive for more family meals, where siblings, typically cast aside in the chaos of living with an autistic sibling, are the center of attention. Lastly, faith, hope and love. Faith has been the most challenging. It’s not easy to stay close to God when you feel fractured. But somehow, God has always managed to keep us together. God, for reasons beyond my understanding, has never left or forsaken us, even during times of hopelessness…Somehow, He always brings us through the storms: stronger, safer and saner…</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span class="versetext4"><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Arial; font-size: 10.5pt;">Hope deferred makes the heart sick, but when dreams come true, there is life and joy Proverbs 13:12</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span class="versetext4"><span style="color: #333333; font-family: Arial; font-size: 10.5pt;">Kim Oakley</span></span><span style="font-family: Verdana;"></span></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-9137579324154856290?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-62456863112010499552011-11-22T13:14:00.000-08:002011-12-04T12:32:36.692-08:00Curing Autism<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Early November, 2011. “Slap, punch, thump,” I hear as I trudge through the door, carrying bags of groceries. <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Please God. Not again.</i> It’s been days of no head hitting. Now this, again! I’m having trouble picturing a happy ending. Once I reach the bedroom, I ask Blake, the nurse, “What’s wrong?”, as if I don’t know. Blake takes a breath and wipes sweat from his brow. He’s been blocking and re-directing my son’s fists for 25 minutes. “I think he has a headache,” he says. “He’s got a fever.” <i style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Swell</i>. A temperature of 99.3 and up is a common antecedent to my son’s self-injurious behavior (SIB). We’ve often suspected headaches accompany fever. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Unsure if anything else is triggering the SIB, the nurse performs a quick body check. No blisters. No bruises. No grimacing when palpitating stomach, legs, arms, etc… We give 1 Alleve. Three hours later, he’s still trying to punch his head. We remove his 7 mg. nicotine patch, wondering if nicotine may be exacerbating a headache. Within 3 hours, he’s hitting stronger and faster, as if the nicotine patch had been holding back a full-blown meltdown. We reapply a stronger nicotine patch (14 mg). After all, nicotine has been helping. Within a few hours his eyes are softer. He takes a nap, probably exhausted from trying to pummel his head. Later wakes up crying. A few head hits, but easily re-directed. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Hours pass. Night nurse arrives. Multiple pro-active (using gentle voice, massaging arms, slowing transition times) and acute interventions (retraining and re-directing flying fists so he doesn’t harm himself) are used. Night meds (Leviracetam, Lomotrigine, Remeron) are given. The deep blue of night gives way to the sun. Blake is back on shift. Intermittent SIB after getting out of morning bath, but to everyone’s astonishment, SIB hasn’t evolved into what we call “crazy SIB.” That’s our code word for behavioral emergency likely to cause bodily injury and require a 911 call. Mostly, because if we’ve exhausted investigative tools our home health setting can do, we have no choice. There is no turn for the worse. We are pleasantly surprised. Figure it must be the Nicotine. But we can’t be too confident. Managing SIB in severe autism&nbsp;is extremely complex. You have to constantly be on top of the situation. And know the individual. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">We give another Alleve. Feed him super-puree’s (Wheat Germ, Liquid B-Vitamins, yogurt, ½ gluten free banana muffin, coconut milk, Raw Protein, egg yolks, carrot juice and pineapple.) We increase doses of garlic. We apply ice packs to head and neck. We keep a 14 mg. nicotine patch on him. It’s helping. We know, because he still has a slight fever. Yet, severe head hitting drifted down to mild hip slapping. A few hours later, he’s laughing. He does a skip walk to the door. He wants to walk outside. “We may have found something that really helps,” says Blake. This is the first time we get to see if nicotine is a contributing factor in controlling rapidly escalating SIB. It will take a few more times of testing. Had it been the nicotine? Had it truly held back crazy SIB? I can’t be sure, but at the moment I’m grateful to get my son back before the SIB— like it has so many other times—takes over, and leaves us spinning and skeptical of hope. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">As I pause and think, I consider that in the valleys and peaks of severe autism, there may not exist the traditional happy ending. Maybe there are only happy days; weeks or months. And unexpected triumphs. </span><br /><span style="font-family: Verdana;"></span><br />&nbsp;</div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Parents of severely-autistic children should not be lured by the seductive, almost mocking call of ‘cure autism now’ movements. For one, to say you are out to “cure autism” is vague and ambiguous. Hope is lost in the chaos of curing a complex condition that has morphed into off-labeling that further complicates curing. Let’s be specific. ‘Curing’ (eradicating) seizures and destructive behaviors and elevating health, happiness and cognition in the autistic individual is a more logical, realistic goal. One we should strive for if we ever hope to improve the lives of autistics in crisis. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Kim Oakley</span></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-6245686311201049955?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com3tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-5211788718012673412011-11-04T12:52:00.000-07:002011-12-04T12:30:19.588-08:00Nicotine Therapy Shows Promise for Autistic Adult<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Gungsuh; font-size: 14pt;">Nicotine Treatment Shows Promise for Self-Injurious Behavior in Autism. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Gungsuh; font-size: 14pt;"><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </span><span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>By: Kim Oakley</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Gungsuh; font-size: 14pt;">Self-Injurious behavior (SIB) is one of the most devastating and difficult to treat behaviors in autistic individuals. As the population of Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) swells, researchers sense the urgency to find new and better treatments. Sadly, this urgency has not extended to self-injurious behaviors in autism. Depending on which study read, about 10-30% of autistics suffer from SIB. That said, let’s pause and recognize the difference between autistics who episodically and mildly self-abuse and those who chronically and savagely self-abuse. For example, an autistic who mildly slaps his leg every few months is a world apart from an autistic that slams his fists into his head or bite pieces of flesh from his arm everyday. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Gungsuh; font-size: 14pt;">Thus, when I write about SIB, I refer to serious case. Cases like my son’s. I’m not the only parent of an autistic child with SIB. There are thousands of other self-injurious autistics around the world. I can only imagine the pain of parents living in a third world country with an autistic child with SIB. Have we even identified where they are? </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Gungsuh; font-size: 14pt;">For decades, academics, behaviorists, psychologists and others have sought to discover reasons and remedies for SIB. Few research studies have held promise. One reason is the standard of care for treating SIB doesn’t include diagnosing brain function. Autistics held captive to years of SIB require a serious examination of brain function. Why the brain? </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Gungsuh; font-size: 14pt;">Autistic brains are unlike other brains. One study showed autistic patients had lower perfusion in right temporal, occipital lobe, thalami, and left basal ganglia (Journal of Neuropsychiatry, 2000). Another showed brain dysfunction in temporal and parietal lobes with left cerebral hemisphere showing greater abnormality than left side (Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Vol 36, No. 7, 1995). </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="background: white; margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Gungsuh; font-size: 14pt;">After revolving inside the world of autism and SIB for over 20 years, I believe a major fueling mechanism involved in SIB is neurotransmitter dysfunction. This would explain fluctuating antecedents. And baffling mood swings. </span><span lang="EN" style="color: #403838; font-family: 'Lucida Sans Unicode'; mso-ansi-language: EN;"></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Gungsuh; font-size: 14pt;">Research shows disruptions of acetylcholine in brains of autistic adults. Interestingly, last year, a functional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) of my son’s brain showed “blunted choline.” I discovered this by persistent inquiry, after repeatedly told test “showed nothing significant.” </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Gungsuh; font-size: 14pt;">Blunted choline in the autistic brain is far from insignificant. It was the first hopeful clue I’d heard in years. Immediately, I began researching ways to elevate choline in brain. That’s how I came across nicotine research. Not that studies show direct connections to nicotine helping autistics with SIB, but nicotine stood out to me as a unique therapy to target and tweak not only acetylcholine, but other neurotransmitters likely involved in fueling my son’s SIB. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Gungsuh; font-size: 14pt;">Case in point— researchers found, along with serotonin and dopamine, deficits in the neurotransmitter acetylcholine may be associated with autism (Gillberg C. Steffenburg, et al., 1989). Stimulation of cholinergic neurons releases dopamine in brain. One study suggested dysregulation in dopamine within basal ganglia as a causative factor of SIB (Canales et al., 2000).</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Gungsuh; font-size: 14pt;">So we see neurotransmitter dysfunction in autism. The challenge is identifying which neurotransmitters are involved in lowering an autistic individual’s SIB threshold. It’s scary to think I would’ve never known my son’s brain was deficient in a neurotransmitter, had I not pushed for an fMRI and later discovered “blunted choline.” I’m not saying every parent of an autistic child should demand brain imaging. But in cases of autism with intractable SIB, it should be the standard of care. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Gungsuh; font-size: 14pt;">Back to nicotine elevating choline in the brain: Nicotine activates cholinergic neurons in many areas of brain, improving memory, focus and concentration. A foggy brain with impaired concentration increases anxiety. Anxiety is one of many antecedents that trigger my son’s SIB. Because multiple antecedents fuel SIB, it’s prudent to rule out and detect if we ever hope to discover more effective treatments for SIB. <span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp;</span></span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Gungsuh; font-size: 14pt;">Not all physicians are receptive to novel, emerging treatments. And even fewer respect a parent’s research and recommendations for therapy. Thankfully, my son’s general practitioner, neurologist and psychiatrist (all females I might add) are amazingly kind and receptive to research and suggestions I’ve presented. They’re open-minded doctors. They want to help my son. I couldn’t ask for a better team of doctors. Surely, this has helped renew hope in what was becoming a hopeless situation. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Gungsuh; font-size: 14pt;">Conclusion: My autistic son began nicotine patch therapy to help treat his chronic, episodic, brutal SIB in July of this year, 2011. He began with 14 mg patch, placed on shoulder, 1x daily, removed at night, and replaced with a fresh patch, in a different location on upper body, in morning. Within a few days, we saw a reduction in SIB and increased focus and concentration. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Gungsuh; font-size: 14pt;">Three weeks later, we lowered the dose. He began wearing the 7mg patch. We saw a slight increase in SIB, but it may have been sparked by constipation or what appeared as a slight cold, which he recuperated from rather quickly (that was odd). </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Gungsuh; font-size: 14pt;">As of today, November 4, 2011, he’s still on 7mg Nicotine Patch daily, with 14 mg patches used PRN (as needed) for days SIB escalates. Using higher dose patch PRN has helped calm him on days he exhibits a sharp increase in slapping or punching his body. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Gungsuh; font-size: 14pt;">We have not seen an increase in seizure activity while on Nicotine Patch. Not even on 14 mg dose. We have seen slight decrease in appetite, on 14 mg patch, however. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Gungsuh; font-size: 14pt;">We have also seen significant increase in laughter, focus and self-control. He’s not so “stuck” or “scattered” in his own world. Also, fine and gross motor skills appear better. Not dragging his feet as much. All in all, while not a cure, using Nicotine Patch therapy to help treat my son’s devastating SIB continues to show promising results. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;">Kim Oakley</div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-521178871801267341?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com2tag:blogger.com,1999:blog-4824082158385477117.post-74747907192429189662011-10-18T23:41:00.000-07:002011-10-18T23:41:27.341-07:00Autism and Managing Constipation<div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><a href="http://www.blogcatalog.com/directory/writing/nonfiction/" title="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory"><img alt="Award Winning Non-Fiction Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory" src="http://www.blogcatalog.com/images/buttons/blogcatalog7.png" style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-right: 0px; border-top: 0px;" /></a><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Gastrointestinal Issues and Autism: What to Do? </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">I don’t care what anyone says, there is something suspicious about the large amount of autistic children and adults who suffer from constipation and fecal impaction. Yep, I know, this is not a glamorous subject. Clearly, not the cute story of Chopin Playing or mathematical savants shown as the popular face of autism. Nonetheless, it’s a reality many raising severely-autistic children face. So, what’s the solution? How do we help these suffering autistics? </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Over the years there have been many theories as to why some autistics are prone to constipation. Some experts say it’s because many autistics tend not to drink enough fluids. Others say it’s due to a lack of fiber. Still others insist it’s rooted in behavioral issues like holding stool and urine. Whatever the etiology, it’s clear we need to find relief for autistics suffering from constipation. Why? Many autistics, such as my son, are behaviorally fragile, which means anything that causes the slightest discomfort, including constipation, is sure to increase meltdowns, self-injurious and other aberrant behaviors. Thus, antidotes and remedies for any condition that thwarts our autistic child’s physical and emotional health are needed. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">One of the most effective treatments I use for my autistic son during bouts of constipation is homemade purees. It starts with a blender. Pureed foods are easier to digest. Moreover, they allow you to give your child foods he/she needs that he/she may not otherwise be willing to eat in solid form. For example, let’s say your child needs protein and iron, but you can’t get them to chew and swallow pieces of chicken or steak. They may— if you puree these foods into a tasty, thick puree. Here is a favorite recipe I’ve used that has helped my autistic son during times of constipation and extra nutrition: </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Mix in blender:</span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">½ cup Virgin Coconut Oil, ¼ cup kidney beans, 1 egg yolk, ¼ cup minced walnuts, ¼ cup flax seeds, ¾ cup whole milk organic yogurt, ¼ cup minced spinach, ¼ cup minced Alaskan salmon, ½ cup organic frozen or fresh blueberries, 1 scoop Garden of Life Raw Meal, 1-2 medium avocados, 1/2 cup pineapple chunks, ¼ cup lecithin granules. Blend. Add Organic Carrot, Pineapple or Aloe Vera juice, as needed for desired thickness. (I’ve also added Stevia and powdered green tea, depending on my son’s acute health needs or gustatory preference for the day, or, well, moment). Feel free to adjust amount or ingredients as per your child’s individual preference and needs. Check with your doctor if you have any concerns about foods that may be contraindicated for your autistic child. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Purees, by the way, are often great for giving hard to swallow meds. Soft texture helps meds go down much easier than if you tried giving pills with solid foods. Purees are also much better than just giving, let’s say, applesauce or pudding, which are greatly lacking in vitamins and ample nutrition. </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Hope this helps someone! </span></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><br /></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 14pt;">Kim Oakley, Mother of severely-autistic young adult son </span></div></div><div class="blogger-post-footer"><img width='1' height='1' src='https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/tracker/4824082158385477117-7474790719242918966?l=www.autismseizureselfinjuriousbehavior.com' alt='' /></div>Kim Oakleyhttp://www.blogger.com/profile/12462216625513839942noreply@blogger.com2